The Telegraph
 
 
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Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Silent watchdogs
Come Pujas and an array of ‘Big Brothers’ will watch Calcuttans at one of the busiest spots in the city: Metro Railway stations. Following the steps of their counterparts in many other metropolises in the world, the underground railway authorities here are putting up high-end surveillan...  | Read.. 
A monumental folly
Fred Pearce is a leading writer on environmental, developmental and demographic issues, and has reported from 54 countries. He is a former news editor ...  | Read.. 
New world under the Arctic
The world’s most inaccessible stretch of ocean, deep beneath the Arctic ice cap, is teeming with far more life than scientists had thought possib ...  | Read.. 
Silent watchdogs
Fastest star
Men cleverer
Artificial lung
Huge conspiracy
Talk and search
If you hadn’t noticed, Google is no longer just an Internet search tool; it’s now a full-blown software company. It develops elegant, efficient software programs ' and then gives them away. In today’s culture of cynicism, such generosi ...  | Read.. 
Robot for moon
Pocket e-reader
Great survivor
It’s hard not to wheedle. Your throat feels as if you’ve swallowed broken glass, your sinuses have been clogged for a couple of days, you’re coughing up green stuff and you’re slated to fly in a week. Never mind that your doctor t ...  | Read.. 
 
Microbes’ metropolis
Two brains instead of one
Italian balm
Chernobyl toll much lower than projected
Caesarean ruins babies’ teeth
Sleepiness from depression
Kids influenced by addiction
QED: Novels’ new horizon
British author Sebastian Faulks’ new novel Human Traces contains provocative ideas about how the mind works. In it, Faulks, a writer acclaimed for bestsellers like Birdsong and Charlotte Gray attempts to recreate the history ...  | Read.. 
Recommended: Story of chasing stars and planets
Stargazer
Fred Watson
De Capo Press; $ 24.95
...  | Read.. 
 
Why Corner
Why does good music evoke our emotion'
 
Doctor's Desk
This week: GYNAECOLOGY