The Telegraph
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Email This Page
MUSIC REVIEWS

Greatest Hits
Shania Twain
Universal; Rs 135

Shania Twain's music is like a refreshing cola; you really don't care what generates the fizz, but it's fizzy all right. Her collection can be hence compared to the lusty champagne that pops up her richest work to date. A frothy blend of contemporary country and modern pop is given the stir by a big hand of rock ' Robert John 'Mutt' Lange (producer/husband) who has ably served to the likes of Def Leppard and Bryan Adams (ever noticed how similar the two artistes sounded at one point of time'). And the hits on this one are huge to say the least.

The mood is generally upbeat save a few ballads that again are dispensed beautifully. The remarkable thing about this collection is that even if you were playing it to those who are oblivious of Shania Twain, they would still claim to have heard at least two tracks from an incredible play list that totals 21 songs. And that would be largely due to sparklers such as You're still the one, Come on over, Love gets me every time, Man I feel like a woman and That don't impress me much from her earlier catalogue.

Up & Ka-ching are more recent megahits whereas she has recorded three brand new tracks to make the collection even more interesting. This is music that will appeal to a broader audience and deserves to be part of an unbiased music lover's collection, even though Shania's happy brand of pop music is best soaked in on a bright and sunny day.

Sunny Dua

Fossils 2
Fossils
Asha Audio; Rs 50

Oh boy, is there angst brimming over in this album! It's a dysfunctional world view and Fossils in Fossils 2 provides you with the ultimate solution ' throw acid in their faces if they don't listen. But a good rock album is not just about a lot of drumbeats, some wild guitar play and a few rasping voices. And more so when the music is just a whole lot of shock and awe. Listen, but at your own peril.

Satadru Ojha

Sharater Aaloy
Monika Chakraborty (Moitra)
Prime Music; Rs 42

Monika Chakroborty (Moitra) tries her voice, this time, on Bengali Modern songs in Sharater Aaloy. Though her voice is a little weary now, she handles the notes with ease. Several composers give music to the songs and are thus different from one another, giving Monika variety. Kichhu smriti kichhu kotha, Eei to dekhechhi aakash, Khol re moner darja are some of the better songs in terms of lyrics and composition.

Madhuparna Das

Nirmalya
Suneha Dutta
Prime Music; Rs 42

As a child artiste, Suneha Dutta has already hogged the limelight, having bagged the Jeeva-Ananda Music Award. She has all the spontaneity and the vivacity of the early teens. This is amply evident in the facility with which she belts out the prayer hymns, addressed to almost all the godheads of the Hindu pantheon. In Oi ranga ranga mati, she enlivens a santhal tune. She has the musical talent, asking to be nourished.

Arnab Bhattacharya

Bandish fusion
Subhen Chatterjee
Prime Music; CD Rs 250

Renowned tabla player Subhen Chatterjee's latest offering in fusion music is a lilting compilation of the East meeting the West. This album's speciality is more than guitar by Lew Hilt, violin by Debshankar and sarod by Dr Rajib Chakraborty ' it has the mesmeric sound of flute by Uday and ghatam by Somnath and, of course, bandish by Raghav and Subhankar Bhaskar.

Fusion is not just about putting two streams of music together. Subhen Chatterjee shows expertise in the knowledge of blending and merging, so that guitar, violin and ghatam can produce the enchanting sound that it does, against the haunting taranas. Kudos to the team for creating music that lingers long after it's over.

Moyna Sen Basu

Top
Email This Page