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ART BRIEFS

But is it choreography'

What is choreography' Is it everything that happens on stage at the intent of the dancer' 'Two Worlds into One in Peace', a duet between Tagore songs by Lee-Alison Sibley, US opera singer, and Odissi dance by Sanchita Bhattacharya, which was presented at the G.D. Birla Sabhagar on November 26, raised this question. Despite her exuberance and zeal, Sibley could not do justice to the Tagore songs (Alo amar alo followed by Phoole phoole dhole dhole) with her operatic modulations. Poor dress sense and lackadaisical movements could not bring out the essence of the verse. One must have a clear concept on a choreographic theme. It must have dynamics translated to the technique one uses. Sanchita's presentation did not possess this quality. Hence the duet failed to achieve the desired symbiosis.

Sharmila Basu Thakur

Layers of consciousness

Disha has put up some stylistically diverse works at the Gallery Chemould. It contains unrelated pictorial expressions such as landscape in oil, conventional Indian art in water colours, portraits in charcoal, and abstract in acrylic. Manashi Majumder and Ayan Ghosal draw their imagery and patterns from dream-like layers of consciousness, while Jyoti Tibrewal and Seema Chaturvedi's neatly delineated figures are infused with varying moods that echo medieval Indian paintings. Sangita Chirimar's work Meera awaits Krishna is an excellent stylisation of traditional Indian painting, whereas Anju Chirimar is rather plainly imitative of received manners of arranging figures and semi-abstract motives.

Samir Dasgupta

Between art and artistry

Given the performing limitations of singing within the hallowed ambit of Aurobindo Bhavan, it takes courage to break into a song from the theatre of Girish Chandra Ghosh. Having proved her mettle in the music of Tagore's contemporaries, Nupur Chhanda Ghosh took the road less taken and rendered Amaar hat dhare tumi niye chalo sakha. Coming after two back-to-back kirtan numbers ' Hari prem gagane and Hari hey tumi amaar ' this delicate Baradaprasanna Majumdar composition freed itself from all its profane connotations and took on a spiritual contour in Ghosh's subdued performance. Throughout the recital she maintained a fine balance between art and artistry ' never letting the embellishments overwhelm the prayerful mood.

Anshuman Bhowmick


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