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IN TODAY'S PAPER
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ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Where’s Diana’s box'
With friends like Paul Burrell, her butler, Diana, Princess of Wales, needed no enemies. For, if mystery is the life of monarchy, as Walter Bagehot wrote, Burrell’s blend of smugness and servility exposes its magic to not just daylight (continuing th...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Strength in numbers
Sir — Consider the paradoxes of human fertility. Here in India, we are 1.1 billion and going strong ...  | Read.. 
 
Revenge motive
Sir — The attacks on the British consulate and the HSBC headquarters in Istanbul were neither unexp ...  | Read.. 
 
Glorious innings
Sir — Steve Waugh’s retirement from international cricket is the end of an era. He is probably the ...  | Read.. 
 
Initial error
Sir — Dr I.G. Patel informs me that his name is Indraprasad, not Indravadan. I regret the error in ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
PROUD TO BE INDIAN
The BJP’s triumph lies in taking India to the 21st century, which, ironically, is an inheritance from Rajiv Gandhi...| Read.. 
 
OPED
Out in the cold
Poor old John le Carré. First he lost his theme — the Cold War — and now he is losing his audience. Those who listened to the end of the embarrassing interview he gave to Jim ...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
The proper study of mankind is man./ Placed on this isthmus of a middle state,/ A being darkly wise, and rudely great:/ With too much knowledge for the sceptic side,/ With too much weakness for the stoic’s pride,/ He hangs between; in doubt to act or rest,/ In doubt to deem himself a god, or beast;/ In doubt his mind or body to prefer,/ Born but to die, and reas’ning but to err;/ Alike in ignorance, his reason such,/ Whether he thinks too little, or too much. — ALEXANDER POPE