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IN TODAY'S PAPER
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Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Sir Indravadan’s last war
Although he had the brains to have become a great economist, he chose the thankless task of serving that capricious master, the government of India, and still managed to keep his integrity intact. He was head and shoulders above his contemporaries: ...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Weighing a problem
Sir — Anastasia Volochkova’s battle against the bulge-watchers, Bolshoi, must have set precedents i ...  | Read.. 
 
Polling time
Sir — The high point of the assembly elections is the realization of the Bharatiya Janata Party tha ...  | Read.. 
 
Badly projected
Sir — We are pained and perturbed at seeing the report, “PM road project chief shot” (Nov 28). Gamm ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
BEYOND CONDOMS
Stigma and discrimination: this was the theme for World AIDS Day this year. What do these words mean' ...| Read.. 
 
ALMOST FREE
Wonder ceases with familiarity. But any objective observer would be forced to grant that the massive scale of the electoral e...| Read.. 
 
FIFTH COLUMN
 
Many turns to the truth
When the West Bengal municipal (amendment) bill, 2003, was passed in the assembly way back in July to legalize water taxes in...  | Read.. 
OPED
Translating dreams into reality
We urge developed countries…to make concrete efforts towards the target of 0.7 per cent of gross national product as official development assistance to developing countries an...  | Read.. 
 
The Eurasian imperative
While everyone in India has been obsessing with the state assembly elections, I have had a rather “European” fortnight, with a week in Germany and then a long encounter over a...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
Why does one never hear the government funding for the preservation and encouragement of comic strips, girlie magazines and TV soap operas' Because these genres still hold the audience they were created to amuse and instruct. — JOHN UPDIKE