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Brett goes ‘Six and Out’ for charity

New Delhi: Other than breaking batsmen’s jaw bones and fingers, Brett Lee can do a few good things too — like undertaking a music tour to raise funds for charity.

If all goes well, Lee will travel with his band Six and Out — which includes his brother and Australian allrounder Shane Lee — to India in June next year to help a charity.

“We have to sit and work out the details of the trip. It is all about planning the band’s travel. If we get a chance to come here, we will pick a charity and help them,” said Lee, who is in India as a brand ambassador for a watch company.

Six and Out, taken from the name given to backyard cricket in Australia, is a band of five New South Wales and Australian cricketers including the Lee brothers. It has released five albums so far.

Lee said his Test captain Steve Waugh has had a great influence on him. “He has been a great mentor, it is pure and simple as that. The stuff that Steve Waugh is talking and trying to do as a person and cricketer has been unbelievable, he has been great for cricket,” Lee said.

Lee said cricketers can be good role models for youngsters of the next generation.

“There are lots of kids out there who aspire to play for the country and they do look up for role models.

“Back home they look up to Glenn (McGrath), Jason (Gillespie) and me as role models for fast bowling and similarly here lot of kids look up to players like Sachin,” Lee said.

The speed merchant, who broke the 160-kmph barrier in the 2003 World Cup, said his motto was to live a simple and happy life.

“It may sound a bit cliched but I just want to be a happy person. I don’t want to worry if things don’t go well on a particular day.

“If you can just hang in there, do the hard work and give yourself every opportunity to succeed, I think that’s more important,” he said.

The 25-year old said the 2000 Ashes tour was one of the worst phases of his blooming career.

“I was coming back from an elbow surgery and it was taking a longer time than expected. People tried to write me off, saying I will never be able to bowl as fast as I did. I am happy I have proved them wrong,” Lee said. (PTI)

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