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IN TODAY'S PAPER
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Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
The poverty of data
For this column, let me begin with a table that I find very odd. This table shows poverty or head count ratios, that is, the percentage of population below the poverty line. And it is for the Northeast, with Sikkim...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Temples of doom
Sir — The report, “Jogi trip sparks shrine clean-up” (August 4), indicates the muck into which Indian politics has shrunk. ...  | Read.. 
 
Cover up
Sir — Swapan Dasgupta’s article, “Witnessing Ayodhya” (August 1), comes as a grim reminder of the ...  | Read.. 
 
Road rage
Sir — The decision of the West Bengal state transport minister, Subhas Chakraborty, to raise car ta ...  | Read.. 
 
Parting shot
Sir — I have been reading The Telegraph keenly for the past few years. But the slips are alr ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
POISONED CUP
The ghost of West Bengal’s labour militancy simply refuses to be buried. And every time it returns to haunt the state, the ho...| Read.. 
 
PAINTERS’ PROTEST
Extreme emotions drive a highly charged creativity. Such emotions often provoke artists to make extreme statements and even t...| Read.. 
 
FIFTH COLUMN
 
Trying to read the good signs
Calling any geographical spot “heaven” is very subjective. One place, however, undeniably kindles images of heaven and that i...  | Read.. 
OPED
Weighing the costs of war
Any serious attempt to launch a successful campaign to achieve the millennium development goals must pay special attention to conflict affected areas. Nearly 60 countries expe...  | Read.. 
 
Down but not out
If Arunachal Pradesh is the potter’s wheel, the National Socialist Council of Nagalim is the stick rotating it. And the pivot around which the wheel is going round is the Muku...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
The most ordinary cause of a single life is liberty, especially in certain self-pleasing and humorous minds, which are so sensible of every restraint, as they will go near to think their girdles and garters to be bonds and shackles. — FRANCIS BACON