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Anand slips to second defeat

Dortmund: Viswanathan Anand suffered his second successive defeat, going down to GM Viktor Bologan of Moldova, in the third round of the Dortmund Sparkassen chess meet on Saturday (as reported in Sunday’s Late City edition).

The Indian GM, who finished at the bottom of the table in his previous outing here in 2002, looks out of sorts in this edition as well, having collected a mere 0.5 points from three rounds.

The former world champion, who drew with Peter Leko in the first round and lost to Teimour Radjabov in the second, is once again at the bottom of the table. Bologan has emerged sole leader with 2.5 points.

In other third round ties, Leko shared the point with Radjabov. World No. 2 Vladimir Kramnik was held by GM Arkadi Naiditsch of Germany. Kramanik is now half-a-point behind Bologan and ahead of Leko and Radjabov. Naiditsch holds the fifth spot with one point.

Anand, who had defeated Bologan at the 2000 world championship in New Delhi, started the game with a Caro Kann Opening and was evenly placed till he committed a tactical error in the middle game that cost him two pawns, and eventually the tie, after 41 moves.

A distracting move of the bishop by Bologan on the 27th move had the Indian in trouble and slowed down his progress on the queenside. Anand then lost a pawn to a simple tactic on the 38th move before resigning.

“The opening was not a surprise, especially with Rustam Dautov as his (Anand’s) second,” Bologan said. Dautov is a renowned expert of the variation and is currently working with Anand.

“Anand has tortured me a few times and this time I got one back,” he said, adding the “Indian probably made too many queen sorties and my attack was faster on his king.”

Prior to this game, Anand was leading the head-to-head between the two with three wins in five clashes with no defeat.

Kramnik converted a boring position into a real fight against Naiditsch but the German was alert enough to salvage a draw after a marathon battle that lasted till the 89th move.

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