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Immortal mortals

San Francisco, July 20 (Reuters): Fancy living another 100 years or more' Some experts said scientific advances will enable humans to last decades beyond what is now seen as the natural limit of the human life span.

“I think we are knocking at the door of immortality,” said Michael Zey, a Montclair State University business professor and author of two books on the future.“I think by 2075 we will see it and that’s a conservative estimate.”

Zey spoke on the sidelines of the annual conference of the World Future Society, a group that ponders how the future will look across many different aspects of society.

“What was science fiction a decade ago is no longer science fiction,” he said. “There is a dramatic and intensive push so that people can live from 120 to 180 years,” he said.

Pool plug

Tehran (AFP): Iranian women have been banned from carrying mobile telephones into swimming pools following the emergence of some devices that can also take digital photographs, the Women in Iran news website reported today. Although swimming pools here are segregated, the ban was imposed after police apparently realised the ease with which a mobile phone user could also now take and instantly transmit images of scantily-clad bathers. The distribution of pictures that show anything more than a women’s face and hands is strictly prohibited in Iran.

Short shrift

New York (Reuters): A pair of President John F. Kennedy’s Navy boxer shorts sold for $5,000 at auction, while an on-line bidder for a personal notebook used during the 1960 Presidential campaign thought her winning bid was for $2,250, not the actual high bid of $22,500. The campaign notebook is black and contains 22 pages of lists, speech ideas and campaign notes. It was used by then Senator Kennedy during the 1960 presidential campaign. Suzanne Vlach, proprietor of Seaview Antique Mall in Seaview, Washington, said from her home in Vancouver, “we thought it was $2,200, not $22,000.”


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