The Telegraph
 
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
CITY NEWSLINES
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Understanding cats
Cats live in our building. They live in the spaces that have no definition, in the shadowy corners of the garage. Sometimes, deep in the night, you hear them quarrelling; as Durga, in Pather Panchali, half-asleep when Apu was born, thought she...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Back to basics
Sir — The fate of the film, Devdas, at both the Oscars and the Bafta awards, shows that hype ...  | Read.. 
 
Scope for misuse
Sir — Calcutta high court’s order to the Calcutta municipal corporation on water taxes is welcome, ...  | Read.. 
 
Failure to enable
Sir — The importance of “integrated education” is one of the many vital points raised in the articl ...  | Read.. 
 
A question
Sir — Will Swapan Dasgupta (“Without nostalgia”, Feb 27) get off from his high horse and explain ho ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
THE CREATOR AND THE CRITIC
Adverse criticism often irks artists. In France, a famous chef has committed suicide because he lost some points in a gourme...| Read.. 
 
DIARY
 
Loosen up, lady
Hair today, gone tomorrow
In the husband’s shoes
An academic in politics
Daily bread... and some jam please
The hunt for a scapegoat
SCRIPSI
To say a man is fallen in love, — or that he is deeply in love, — or up to the ears in love, — and sometimes even over head and ears in it, — carries an idiomatical kind of implication, that love is a thing below a man: — this is recurring again to Plato’s opinion, which, with all its divinityship, I hold to be damnable and heretical: — and so much for that. Let love therefore be what it will. — LAURENCE STERNE