The Telegraph
 
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
CITY NEWSLINES
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Nuclear doublespeak
The author is former director general military operations and currently director, Delhi Policy Group...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Drawing their own lessons
Sir — Why do B-schools need an excuse to read up their Shakespeare (“B-school lessons from the Bard ...  | Read.. 
 
Blame yourself
Sir — The allegations of the Khaleda Zia government that India is responsible for Bangladesh being ...  | Read.. 
 
Think again
Sir — It is heartening to note that the Centre is thinking of upgrading the BE College to a nationa ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
SPOILT FOR CHOICE
The University Grants Commission must think through what it means by higher education. But thought seems to have been conspic...| Read.. 
 
GARLAND OF GAINS
The recent visit to India of the Iranian president, Mr Syed Mohammed Khatami, has, by all accounts, been a success. Although ...| Read.. 
 
FIFTH COLUMN
 
How to check errant lawyers
T he Supreme Court’s December 17 ruling that lawyers had no right to go on strike and would have to compensate their clients ...  | Read.. 
OPED
Bush’s biggest gamble
The author is former US deputy secretary of state and the first director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization...  | Read.. 
 
When life becomes a punishment
But I had to ask myself — could I send another man’s son to death under the deeply flawed system of capital punishment we have...' A troubled young man with a history of menta...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men. There is no worse heresy than that the office sanctifies the holder of it. — JOHN ACTON