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Bluestock to give peace a chance

Spreading the message of peace, unity, love and compassion through blues music. That’s the reason Bluestock was born on January 3 this year, drawing inspiration from Mother Teresa as well as guitar god Carlos Santana.

The first stop in the lyrical sojourn of the six-member outfit with a mission and an “original repertoire of rhythm and blues” comes up within a fortnight in the city.

“We will hold our first gig soon, and the proceeds will go towards supporting leprosy patients,” declares Joy Bhaduri, former frontman of Crosswind (which has subsequently become Krosswindz), and prime mover behind the “Bluestock movement”.

Joy, who has put in 12 years of voluntary service at the leprosy centre after his first meeting with Mother Teresa “transformed” his life, believes blues music has the power to heal.

“Beholding life’s united essence — that’s how I interpret the word b-l-u-e, and Bluestock’s principal aim is to extend a helping hand through its music,” he explains.

Heavily influenced by the music of Santana, the 34-year-old singer-lyricist-painter-writer-photographer is keen on involving the king of the Latin lead in his tribute project for leprosy patients, The Blue Lifelines.

“I had e-mailed Santana with the proposal of the musical project to help leprosy victims and requested him to take charge of the programme. His younger brother, Jorge, has written back saying that Carlos has a very tight schedule at the moment, but would surely consider the project once he is through with current commitments,” narrates Joy.

He has also sent manuscripts of his books — A Blue Lifeline and Children of the Dust — to Santana’s Milagro Foundation, which deals with children. Bluestock’s blend of R&B, jazz and fusion music draws heavily from the likes of Jimmy Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

The blues man, who calls himself “an expressionist”, works with street-children, encouraging them to read, write and paint, “and most important, not to steal”.

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