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Hawks’ offer to Musharraf

Islamabad, Nov. 11: The Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) leader Qazi Hussain Ahmed said Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf can be ratified as a civilian President if he vacates his military offices.

“To end the deadlock it is imperative that the National Assembly be convened at the earliest and Gen. Pervez Musharraf should come out of the Legal Framework Order circle to make this possible

“If he vacates his military offices, a way can be found to validate him as civilian President under the aegis of the constitution,” Ahmed said here today after a meeting with Musharraf.

He said the present stalemate is not a product of politicians. The political crisis can be resolved only if the National Assembly is convened at the earliest, he added. “It is in the best interests of the nation, armed forces and Musharraf himself” he added.

Earlier, Ahmed said he had held talks with the Tehreek-e-Insaaf leader Imran Khan as part of negotiations to chalk out a way for the restoration of democracy in Pakistan.

Imran Khan said there was complete unanimity among them on all issues including the restoration of the constitution.

Khan said it was necessary that the sovereignty of the country be restored and US military bases abolished. He said the arrest of Dr Amir Aziz by the FBI was not acceptable. Khan said he has assured Qazi of his complete cooperation.

Benazir respect

Former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto said it was very difficult to work with a military dictator who has trampled the constitution. “The law is supreme and Musharraf should also respect that law,” she said in an interview with the BBC. Asked if she would instruct her party to join hands with Musharraf, she said her party’s relationship with the general would depend on the mutual respect of the system that had been put into place.

Pakistan said an international security force in Afghanistan closed its supply base in Karachi on Friday, a few days ahead of schedule. A spokesman of Pakistan’s Civil Aviation Authority said the International Security Assistance Force, which used Karachi airport and other facilities on commercial terms for almost 10 months, had vacated the airport building.

“They have closed their operations from here and handed over all our facilities, including the hotel, to us,” the spokesman said.

The base at Karachi airport was used by Britain and several other members of the international force helping Afghan security forces maintain order in the capital, Kabul.

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