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Indian’s giant at Tate

London, Oct. 8 (Reuters): A giant, blood-red sculpture symbolically depicting the flaying of Marsyas the satyr by the god Apollo in Greek mythology was revealed to the public in central London on Tuesday.

Immediately joining the ranks of the world’s biggest sculptures, the soaring work by renowned Indian artist Anish Kapoor spans the entire length, width and height of the cavernous main hall of the Tate Modern art gallery.

“It is a monumental work for a monumental space,” Kapoor said. Marsyas was flayed by Apollo for having the temerity to play the flute better than the god himself.

The work took six weeks to construct and will be on show for six months. Kapoor, born in Mumbai in 1954, trained at the Chelsea School of Art and now lives and works in London. He is now planning an exhibition in India. “I have never shown there. It is very exciting,” he said.

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