Mongia, Yuvraj end India’s ‘final’ jinx
No decision yet on second 'keeper
Sourav toasts ‘exuberance of youth’
Look out for Gangjee: Atwal
Barua beaten, Humpy held
Deep ton powers East Zone to 261/4
Md. Sp. in goal spree
EB in semis
Calcutta Races/ Assertive Dancer set to strike
Mumbai Racing/ Music Prospector may score

Guwahati, March 19: 
INDIA 333/6 (50 ovs)
ZIMBABWE 232 (42.1 ovs)

It’s not unusual for Dinesh Mongia to take a corner table and have a quiet meal all by himself. Equally, it’s rare for John Wright to be part of a group. In their own way, both are very intense individuals.

On Sunday night, however, they decided on dinner together and notes were exchanged for over an hour. Typically passionately, one-time opener Wright made the point about consolidating once the first 15 overs had passed.

At the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium today, Mongia responded with a turf-scorching unbeaten 159 (147 balls, 17x4, 1x6), a career-best innings which powered India to a smashing 101-run victory over Zimbabwe in the fifth and final match of the Pepsi Cup 2002.

[The last 150-plus innings, by an Indian, was back in November 1999 — present captain Sourav Ganguly’s 153 not out versus New Zealand, in Gwalior.]

India, of course, not just won the game but the series. Clearly, the national selectors won’t now have a reason to defer choosing the West Indies-bound squad.

While it’s fashionable to talk of a match-winning innings, the Chandigarh-based Mongia indeed cracked a series-clinching one. More pleasing is that he batted cleanly and didn’t flirt with the slam-bang stuff. For Mongia, the runs came both in front and behind the wickets.

It was one class act, the sole blemish being an early let-off by Tatenda Taibu.

Thanks to Mongia, utilised in this series as opener owing to the non-availability of Sachin Tendulkar and Virender Sehwag, the outcome was decided even before Zimbabwe’s ‘chase’ began. The ask, at around seven an over, was simply too much.

What made it worse for Stuart Carlisle’s team is that Match Referee John Reid docked two overs for overshooting the allotted (bowling) time by 18 minutes. An allowance, though, was made for time wasted on account of the sight-screens.

Absolutely delighted at collecting a wonderful double, Mongia told The Telegraph emotionally: “It’s my first hundred for India, my first real big innings… I dedicate it to my parents (Bishambar Lal and Jeevan) and sister Poonam... I’m also thankful to our coach (Wright), who always presents a complete picture of what I should be doing...”

Just as pleased was Sourav. While lauding Mongia, he warmed the hearts of Yuvraj Singh fans, when he said: “The difference between the teams, in the last two games, was Yuvraj... His role in our recovery from 1-2 down can’t be emphasised enough.”

Man of the Match in ODI No.4, in Hyderabad, Yuvraj posted another electric knock: 75 off 52 deliveries (6x4, 3x6). Each of the pin-up boy’s overboundaries was pulled, sending the capacity turnout into a frenzy.

Mongia and Yuvraj, in fact, were associated in a scintillating (record) 158-run partnership for the fifth-wicket. It came off 107 balls, an indication of the treatment meted out to the Travis Friends and Gary Brents. The dent in their confidence won’t quickly be repaired.

So brutal were the youngsters that Carlisle forgot all lessons in field placements and his bowlers didn’t quite know where to pitch. All this while, the runs came quicker than Derby winners off the starting stalls, even though the wicket did produce moments of uncertainty.

In fact, the last ten overs saw an unbelievable 121 runs, with the 250 to 300 mark being bridged in 13 minutes and 16 deliveries! The mayhem ended with Yuvraj’s dismissal, who tried to force the pace even more.

Later, Carlisle could only mumble: “They came hard at us...” An understatement, if ever there was one.

Incidentally, India crossed the 300-barrier for the second time in four games. In Faridabad, the total read 319 for six. Moreover, today’s tally not only beat the previous best here — 306 for six by the West Indies against New Zealand in 1994-95 — but made it India’s highest-ever versus Zimbabwe.

Sourav, who won the toss, himself took the initiative early on when he whacked Douglas Hondo and Heath Streak in successive overs. In an exclusive chat yesterday, he had promised to bat freely. For a while, it seemed Sourav would keep his word. As it turned out, he didn’t move his feet well enough and became a Streak victim after a promising 28 (32 balls).

Next to go was V.V.S. Laxman, run out when non-striker Mongia had a unnecessary rethink on what was the striker’s call. Then, it was Rahul Dravid’s turn to exit. Mohammed Kaif, too, disappointed and at 157 for four (31st over) most were looking at India getting to around 250-260.

For the script to change, somebody had to do a Nathan Astle of sorts. Luckily, North Zone mates Mongia and Yuvraj appeared to draw inspiration from the New Zealander’s stellar show in Christchurch. What followed, then, was super stuff. It slammed the door on Zimbabwe.

Having to climb the equivalent of Mount Everest, and in the most adverse of conditions, Zimbabwe began sensibly but the in-form Alistair Campbell’s dismissal (31 in 38 deliveries) at 50 (11th over) eliminated the possibility of even a miracle.

While the breakthrough was effected by Zaheer Khan, Harbhajan Singh struck a double blow in the 23rd over: Friend was deceived by his ‘doosra’ while, in the circumstances, the monarch-status enjoying Andy Flower played like a pauper. But, yes, full marks to Zaheer for a great catch.

Steady Dion Ebrahim followed (42 in 69 balls), bowled by Sourav in trying to glance, and Carlisle became a Vijay Bharadwaj victim. Grant Flower and Streak did show some defiance (84 for the sixth-wicket), but the famed Zaheer yorkers did the needful.

Grant and, then, Douglas Marillier — a one-match fluke, really — departed in almost identical fashion. That Zaheer is back to being liberal with yorkers suggests he is now sky high on confidence. Obviously, being dropped straight after the South Africa tour has got him back on track.

With the light deteriorating, it was a matter of time before the innings’ formal closure. In the event, the final blows too were landed by Harbhajan, who finished with excellent figures of four for 33.

The 15-month wait for a limited overs’ series win at home ended. It would surely have brought much joy to Naren Tamhane, who passed away a few hours before the game.


Guwahati, March 19: 
It was last Wednesday that the national selectors deferred naming the XVI for the West Indies but, even now, it’s not clear who one of the two wicketkeepers will be. There is, however, “unanimity” over young Ajay Ratra occupying one slot.

According to The Telegraph’s sources, veteran Nayan Mongia could well come into the frame with the other contenders being Deep Dasgupta and Mannava Sri Kanth Prasad. This, really, isn’t any different from last week’s ‘confused’ scenario.

This selection (in Mumbai on Thursday), of course, will be for the five-Test series only — April 11- May 22. The squad for the five ODIs (May 25-June 2) will be chosen later.

Mongia’s backers, though, will first have to “assess” exactly how his comeback will be received by the rest of the team, specially the seniors. It’s no secret that many are distinctly unhappy with Mongia’s attitude. Basically, he isn’t regarded as a team man.

Then, certain questions remain about the veteran’s past... Mongia, 32, has been out of the team for exactly a year.

Where Deep is concerned, misgivings over his ‘keeping haven’t evaporated. Yet his batting — and the excellent option it provides to the thinktank — isn’t something that can be lightly dismissed. The top fear, however, is: What if he lets off a Brian Lara early? The answer isn’t comforting.

Still, as was reported in these columns last week, Deep can’t be ruled out entirely. Moreover, his unbeaten 109 at the Eden today, in the Duleep game, could just come in handy.

Prasad, regarded as having a safe pair of hands, an absolute prerequisite for ‘keepers, will emerge a real strong ‘challenger’ should there be a consensus on taking two specialists instead of “compromising” for the sake of balance.

Incidentally, Prasad has been out of the team even longer than Mongia — his last appearance was in the Sydney Test, 26 months ago.

Media Workshop

Meanwhile, in an absolute first, the BCCI is planning to hold a Media Workshop for the West Indies-bound players. It will probably be conducted by Prannoy Roy, the big gun of the small screen.


Guwahati, March 19: 
The Indian cricketers have very strong reservations about making another appearance here — a fall-out of yesterday’s incident involving Harbhajan Singh and security personnel — yet, today, this city brought them luck.

Specifically, the 101-run win over Zimbabwe helped India take the one-day series with a 3-2 scoreline.

“Of course, it’s a great feeling... With so many seniors missing, this team was lacking in experience. However, just look at the way they fought back after being 1-2 down,” an absolutely happy Sourav Ganguly told The Telegraph.

Later, interacting with the Media, the Indian captain specially praised Dinesh Mongia,

Yuvraj Singh and Ajay Ratra. “All of them are young — as, in fact, is Harbhajan — and each one of them performed the assigned role... A captain couldn’t be asking for more...”

While Sourav spoke of Yuvraj as having been the difference in the last two games, he complimented Mongia for not throwing it away today after getting past his maiden hundred — a stupendous unbeaten 159.

As for Ratra, he said: “He’s been very good and has a very safe pair of hands...”

Asked who would open once Sachin Tendulkar and Virender Sehwag were available, Sourav gave a practical answer: “The best two... That’s how I see it...” Clearly relaxed after the win, Sourav quipped it was the “exuberance of youth” which had not only lifted the team’s fielding but running between the wickets.

And, when somebody asked about preparations for the up-coming West Indies tour, the captain smiled and replied: “It will be by way of a short break, at home.” Well deserved, for sure.

Stuart Carlisle, the Zimbabwe captain, talked of the “positives” in general instead of focussing on the washout at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium. But he made a significant point when he spoke of “individual performances (only)” from his team.

Meanwhile, MoM and MoS Mongia emphasised that though he is a middle-order bat, he accepted the opening slot “as a challenge” and that he wanted to “make the most” of opportunities during the series.

He definitely did — totalling 263-runs, besides bagging three wickets as a ‘surprise weapon.’


Calcutta, March 19: 
The lifestyle has changed over the years. He has a doting father, somebody who has nurtured the very essence of his ambition from a young age. But today, Arjun Atwal is into his own, a lifestyle that he has crafted for himself with all the intense love that golf requires at its stratospheric levels.

Today, when Arjun does manage to touch base, he still remains way off his Calcutta home, making do with a touchdown in the Capital, that too because the Indian Open he just missed due to better commitments ($ 300,000 against $ 1.5 million!) is winding up. And then his parents fly over to Delhi for a dekko of their star son and bahu, Sona.

From the time he first had a round with Tiger Woods in the Thai Open (and that was a moment he still cherishes), to the day he won the Indian Open, and then last month, the sterling victory in the $ 900,000 Caltex Singapore Masters, the 29-year-old has come a long way from when he followed his father H.S. Atwal to the Royal Calcutta Golf Club, picking dreams.

“Actually, I have been travelling too much the last two months,” Atwal told The Telegraph over phone from Delhi. “It has been around seven-eight countries in this period (including South Africa, Australia, Myanmar, Singapore, Dubai, Qatar), working at the courses and soaking up the best that the European and Asian Tours can offer, it gets tiring. I had to just get off the stuff for a while and just chill out. Now my parents are also here and I’ll rest. I start, over to Spain and build up to the US Open which I want to qualify for in mid-June.”

Scheduling apart, he has been learning. Learning that there is more to the world for Indian aspirants on the greens than a hangout around the Asian PGA. “It is that, say, the tenth Order of Merit ranker on the Asian Tour is way down the tenth Order of Merit ranker on the Euro Tour,” he said. “The atmosphere is different, the courses are different, the chill factor, and, of course, all those great players to vie with. You re-learn a great many things.

“I am at present tenth on the Euro Tour money list,” he said. “That will translate to a great performance if I manage to finish the season at least that way. Ultimately, though, I am all for the US PGA.”

The other major factor is the coaching. The idea of an ex-player coaching an aspiring pro, or even an established pro in this country is “not on.” “You need trained coaches. Somebody who can watch and correct, and keep at it, with regular inputs. You need a coaches’ training centre for that. My last coach, Sam Frost of South Africa helped me tighten up my swing so well… I believe you will need to import some coaches for some time (like in tennis) and results will follow… But don’t get me wrong. India is today full of very bring potential, and there is great talent.

“Rahil Gangjee, who has just turned pro (and picked up a title too, the Lucknow pro meet in October), I feel, is the most talented player in the country at the moment. Lookout for him, and you will find another Harmeet Kahlon or maybe more in the days to come.”

That brought the discussion back to Calcutta. “The Royal has remained a haunting ground, probably a bit of modernisation is necessary, but the old charm is great,” said Arjun. He will probably be back ‘home’ late this month. But that is if he is able to steal time from himself.


Calcutta, March 19: 
A clear leader failed to emerge after the third round of the Goodricke International Open chess tournament at Alekhine Chess Club today. With nine players clubbed together on 2.5 points, the next few rounds might provide some interesting struggle at the top.

On a day, when most of the top board games ended in a draw, G.B. Prakash of India brought some cheer to the Indian camp with his upset win over the Slovenian Grandmaster Drazen Sermek.

GM Krishnan Sasikiran, overnight joint leaders and playing with black pieces against GM Maxim Sorokin of Argentina, obtained a clear advantage from the opening. At one time, it seemed that Sasikiran would prevail over his opponent as he had the better development of his pieces. He even created a passed pawn on the ‘a’ file in endgame, but, despite his valiant efforts to squeeze out a win, Sorkin escaped with a draw.

Prakash, playing his usual brand of solid position chess, effectively utilised his extra pawn in a rook and bishop versus rook and opposite coloured bishop to create a mating net around his opponent’s king.

Prakash has already confirmed his third GM norm last year and requires to touch the ELO rating of 2500 to achieve the title.

On the third board, GM Alexander Fominyh Of Russia and GM Arsen Yegiazarian of Armenia were content to retain their positions near the top and agreed to a quick draw in 14 moves in a Catalan opening.

The only disappointment for the Indians at the top was GM Dibyendu Barua’s loss against the Russian Grandmaster Evgeny Gleizerov. Gleizerov once against played an excellent ending in a bishop versus knight ending, putting paid to Barua’s all efforts to salvage a draw.

GM norm aspirants Sandipan Chanda and Tejas Bakre won their respective games against Lanka Ravi and Vikramjit Singh to take their tally to two points.

Meanwhile, Koneru Humpy’s GM norm trail slowed down once again as she was held to a draw by K Visweswaran of India.

RESULTS (third round)

Pavel Kotsur (2.5) drew with Alexander Goloshchapov (2.5), Maxim Sorokin (2.5) drew with K Sasikiran (2.5), Alexander Fominyh (2.5) drew with Arsen Yegiazarian (2.5), Sergei Ovsejevitsch (2) drew with Aleksei Aleksandrov (2.5), Alexander Motylev (2.5) beat P Mahesh Chandran (1.5), Evgeny Gleizerov (2.5) beat Dibyendu Barua (1.5), Abdulla Al-Rakib (1.5) lost to Saunas Sulskis (2.5), Alexey Kuzmin (2) drew with Md. N. Al Sayed (2), Andrey Shariyazdanov (2) drew with Leorg Blauert (2), G.B. Prakash (2) beat Drazen Sermek (1), Ruslan Sherbakon (1.5) drew with Sriram Jha (1.5), Bogdan Lalic (2) beat Krishna Thapa (1), Ehsan Ghaem Maghami (1.5) drew with Swati Ghate (1.5), R B Ramesh (2) beat Rahul Shetty (1), S Kidambi (1.5) drew with Abhijit Kunte (1.5), Tejas Bakre (2) beat Vikramjit Singh (1), Lanka Ravi (1) lost to Sandipan Chanda (2), Enamul Hossain (0.5) lost to Wong Zi Jing (1.5), K Visweswaran (1) drew with Koneru Humpy (1), P Konguvel (1.5) beat Suvrajit Saha (0.5), V Saravanan (1.5) beat Aarthie Ramaswamy (0.5), Dinesh Kr Sharma (1) drew with Nisha Mohota (1), Somak Palit (1) drew with T.S. Ravi (1), S. Satyapragyan (1.5) beat Rahul Sangma (0.5), Saheli Dhar Barua (1.5) drew with Deep Sengupta (1.5), P.D.S. Girinath (0) lost to Saptarshi Roy Chowdhury (1), Ghader Pour Shayeste (0) lost to Yogesh Gore (1).


Calcutta, March 19: 

His ‘keeping of late hasn’t been encouraging but Deep Dasgupta is determined not to let that affect his batting. Ahead of the selection for the West Indies tour, he sent a timely reminder to the selectors with an unbeaten hundred for East Zone at Eden Gardens today.

The first day of the Duleep Trophy tie versus Central Zone belonged to the hosts with the 115-run opening stand between Shiv Sundar Das and Deep giving them the perfect launch pad for a big total. The duo ensured that the advantage of winning the toss was not surrendered.

Central’s attack was insipid and with very little assistance from the wicket, the bowlers’ task was made all the more difficult. Das and Deep went about their task in a calculated manner, not taking any undue risk and waiting for the loose deliveries.

The India openers tackled the opening session with ease on an uncovered wicket. The ball did move around a bit but the bounce was not alarming.

“The wicket was damp and the ball was moving around. The odd ball did stop and come. Playing in such conditions was a good experience,” Deep said later.

For Deep, it was an innings of immense importance. He showed concentration and application in sticking around 362 minutes and 278 balls in sultry conditions for his unbeaten 109. There was hardly a false stroke attempted except for one instance in the ‘Nervous Nineties’. Most of his 13 boundaries came through flowing drives on both sides of the wicket.

He, however, did survive a half-chance at slip and a couple of close calls but then the Central fielders seemed to be appealing at everything.

“There was no pressure to perform as such but at the back of your mind it’s always there,” he admitted. “I’ve done my personal bit, now it’s upto… ” he added.

If Deep looked in good touch during his maiden Duleep hundred, Das (60 off 116 balls, 11x4) didn’t disappoint either. He was his usual confident self, playing every shot with precision and timing and seemed distinctly displeased when adjudged leg before off Narendra Hirwani.

A little later, Rashmi Ranjan Parida decided to give catching practice to Jai Prakash Yadav at mid wicket but Sanjay Raul stuck around to give Deep support.

Though the 104-run partnership flourished, in their bid to steal the singles, there were horrible misunderstandings that could have proved suicidal.

Prabhanjan Mallick came in to unleash a flurry of strokes — a couple of pulled fours and a lofted six over mid wicket off Hirwani. The fireworks, though, took a toll as he retired with a pulled back muscle.

Subhamoy Das failed to live up to his reputation and lasted just three balls. It was thus left to Deep and Laxmi Ratan Shukla to see the day through.

The hosts will obviously try to score enough in the first innings to ensure they do not have to bat a second time. But Deep sounded a note of warning.

“The wicket doesn’t seem too good. The odd one is bouncing and turning. Anything above 350 should be a good total,” he said.

Getting to that score should not be a major problem with none of the bowlers making an impact. Hirwani never looked threatening and it was Kulamani Parida who returned best figures. It will take a lot of effort from the bowlers to restrict East below 400.


Calcutta, March 19: 
Mohammedan Sporting today whipped Calcutta Parsees 9-1 in their BHA league first division group B match. Ajam Ali scored four, but missed a hattrick, Rama Shankar and Sarsar Ahmed scored two each and Mohammed Shahid scored another. Jaan Mehta reduced the margin for Parsees.

In another match, Punjab SC beat Calcutta Rangers 2-1, Rupinder Singh and Inderjit Singh scoring.

Panja in quarters

Top seed Saurav Panja beat qualifier Arif N. Hassan 6-3, 6-2 today to move into the men’s quarter finals of the Central Excise Open tennis championship.

Also moving into the quarters was third seed Harshit Sharma who beat another qualifier Ajay Singh 4-6, 6-1, 6-2.

The other quarter final entrants were Vinod K. Sewa and Abhishek Jagnani.

Other results: Women’s singles — Shivika Burman bt Sucheta Sengupta 6-0, 6-1; Oindrilla Majumdar bt Payel Ray 6-1, 6-1.

Amateur golf

The Royal Calcutta Golf Club will host an amateur strokeplay event from Thursday to March 24 and 80 entries have been received, including those in the top 20 rankings, says a press release issued by the club today.

Among the local amateurs are Ranjit Singh, Sudip Chitlangia and Lakshman Singh.


Calcutta, March 19: 
East Bengal today made it to the senior CAB league championship play-off semi-finals with a six-wicket victory over Tapan Memorial.

In the semi-final they will take on arch-rivals Mohun Bagan.

At Rajdanga, East Bengal, who were 101 for four overnight, finished off the formalities quickly as Naushad Akhtar and Dharmendra Singh remained unbeaten on 35 and 29, respectively, as their team raced to 144 for four.

Brief scores: Tapan Memorial 138. East Bengal 144/4 in 44.1 overs (N. Akhtar 35 n.o., D. Singh 29 n.o.; Rajib Dutta 3/47). East Bengal won by 6 wkts.


Calcutta, March 19: 
After weeks of lashing at the hands of bookmakers, lady luck may finally smile at the city turfites tomorrow. The six events day’s card offer something to cheer about because, the fate of a number of favourites will be in the safe hands of champion jockeys Prakash Bhonsle and Cristopher Alford. While Cristopher could be counted upon to guide Alamito to victory in the 2,000m Zarashah Cup, Prakash will certainly be at advantage on Assertive Dancer in the day’s feature, the 1,600m Grand Annual Handicap, a premier juvenile event until the ‘Million’ concept hit the turf. The Razeen-Roccobarocco filly from Daniel David’s yard had finished placed only half-a-length behind her stable-mate Smart Ruler recently in the RCTC Million and over an identical trip.

Alamito, on the other hand, had finished only a neck behind the prized filly Touch of Silver in the St Leger. On the strength of that performance, the Bharath Singh-trainee may be hard to toss. Among the other Prakash-rides, it is Alborada who, over his favourite trip, 1,600m, may come good in the Colorado Claro Handicap.

Race card and selections

1. Colorado Claro Handicap 1,600m (Cl IV, Cl V eligible, Rt 00-50) 1.35 pm: Scavenger’s Son 61 Gajender 4; Alborada 60.5 Prakash 2; Grand Lodge 60.5 Gowli 3; Brave Show 59.5 C. Alford 1; Adeline 56.5 Asghar 7; Black Mane 56.5 Smith 8; Impressive Prince 53 R. Ahmed 5; Royal Ruler 51 A. P. Singh 6.

1. Alborada (2) 2. Brave Show (4) 3. Black Mane (6)

2. Zara Shah Cup 2,000m (Cl II, Cl III eligible, Rt 44-94) 2.15 pm: Illustrious Reign 60 Brij S. 4; Winning Glory 56.5 A. P. Singh 8; Argolis 56 Prakash 3; No Regrets 54.5 Gowli 2; Alamito 53.5 C. Alford 6; Raring To Go 53 Yasin 7; Cool Quest 48.5 Amil 1; Yukon 47.5 Tamang 5.

1. Alamito (5) 2. Argolis (3) 3. No Regrets (4)

3. Grand Annual Handicap 1,600m (Handicap for 3-y-o only) 2.45 pm: Royal City 60 Asghar 2; Assertive Dancer 59.5 Prakash 3; Carbon Steel 53 Shanker 4; Pehlvan 48.5 Rabani 1.

1. Assertive Dancer (2) 2.Royal City (1)

4. Valamour Handicap 1,100m (Cl III, 5-y-o & over, Rt. 44-72) 3.20 pm: Alkido 60.5 M. Maseyk 2; Crimson King 56.5 Prakash 3; Gallant Romeo 56 Asghar 11; Khublei 55.5 A. P. Singh 7; Winning Hand 55.5 Gowli 6; Bird’s Empire 55 B. Gurang 5; Kargil Soldier 55 Brij S. 4; Ardon 53.5 R. Ahmed 1; Classic Pursuit 51.5 Rabani 10; Ace Of Spades 50 S. Salam 9; Simply Monarch 47.5 Yasin 8

1. Crimson King (2) 2. Bird’s Empire (6) 3. Winning Hand (5)

5. Mysore Race Club Cup 1,200m (Cl I; Rt 88 & over) 3.55 pm: Beneficent 64.5 Gajender 9; Acute 57 Islam 1; Comedy of Errors 54 A. P. Singh 10; Soviet Ride 54 Prakash 5; Clarice Cliff 53 Rabani 2; Dancing Dreams 53 Gowli 3; Secret Blessing’s 51 Yasin 8; Ballet Master 50 Yacoob 4; Amusing 49 S. Salam 7; Annella 47 Amil 6.

1. Soviet Ride (4) 2. Dancing Dreams (6) 3. Secret Blessing’s (7)

6. Nikita Handicap 1,200m (Cl V; 00-28) 4.30 pm: Ever So Loyal 60 Islam 5; Wild Is The Wind 59.5 C. Alford 2; Darth Vader 58.5 Gowli 6; Crest Star 57.5 Yasin 1; Flying Power 55.5 Tamang 7; Jayaashva 55.5 Brij S. 8; Blushing Brave 54.5 Smith 4; Don Vittorio 51.5 Shanker 3; Gul 49 Som S 9.

1. Darth Vader (3) 2. Don Vittorio (8) 3. Blushing Brave (7)

Day’s Best: Alamito

Double: Alborada & Assertive Dancer.

Mumbai, March 19: 
Music Prospector, from trainer Dallas Todywalla’s stable, gets the first call in the 1,400m Nelston Trophy, a terms race for three-year-old horses that takes the centre stage in the six-event Mumbai race-card on Wednesday. To be ridden by jockey Kieren Fallon, the well-bred horse by Placerville out of Lap of Luxury had placed a decent third in his last start.


3.30 pm: Magic Honey 1. Khim 2. Duke of Albany 3.
4 pm: Sky Bound 1. Going For Glory 2. King Crimson 3.
4.30 pm: Music Prospector 1. Rapacious 2. Divineintervention 3.
5 pm: Swift And Silent 1. Proud Moment 2. Big Bang 3.
5.30 pm: Fairy Goddess 1. Ocean Stream 2. Ladybank 3.
6 pm: Auchinblae 1. Super Sword 2. Bound By Honour 3.

Day’s Best: Music Prospector

Double: Sky Bound & Magic Honey

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