India fight back to parity
ICC lands in the Asian era
Career-best, says Yuvraj
Asian Games main target: Gopi
A meet for Humpy’s tryst with destiny
Bagan for inquiry
E. Railway in semi-finals
Calcutta Racing/ Gutsy win for Touch of Silver
Mumbai Racing/ ‘Shadows’ may lift fillies’ event
Bangalore Racing/ Star Chieftan wins main event

Hyderabad, March 16: 
Zimbabwe 240/8 (Ovs)
India 244/5 (48.1 ovs)
MoM: Yuvaraj

Yuvraj Singh and Mohammed Kaif were two central characters of the Indian team which won the under-19 World Cup in Sri Lanka in early 2000. The two celebrated their getting together for the senior national team with a scintillating partnership today which took the fourth one-dayer away from Zimbabwe.

It could not have come at a better time as India were staring down the barrel with all the experienced hands back in the pavilion and the spectators had already started the countdown to yet another unsuccessful chase. But the youngsters put together 92 runs from 91 balls to help their team past Zimbabwe’s 240 for eight.

The five-wicket win put India back in the frame and ensured that Guwahati is going to witness a decider Tuesday. But there was a time when even the staunchest of followers were getting ready for a defeat which would have resulted in Zimbabwe’s first ever ODI series win in India.

Despite plucking out the Flower brothers at a time when they threatening to cut loose, India failed to stop Zimbabwe from posting a challenging 240 for eight and at 56 for three in the 13th over, the spectre of losing the series was looming large. However, Kaif showed immense maturity and kept India afloat with a 71-run, fourth-wicket stand with Rahul Dravid and after that, Yuvraj provided the power that took India past the Zimbabwean total with 11 balls to spare. It looked easy in the end, but, then, the scoreboard has rarely been a true indicator of how things went, and today was no different.

The Yuvraj onslaught started in the 40th over bowled by Grant Flower when India were 79 short of the target. The Punjab left-hander justified his recall with some bold and intelligent hitting and started by punching Grant through the covers for four. Heath Streak went for two more in the next over, the one lifted over mid-wicket with immaculate timing and wrist work standing out, and suddenly the chase was on.

Kaif, Yuvraj’s senior partner in the under-19 team (he was the captain) realised that his mate was on song and let him enjoy most of the strike. It was a wise move as Yuvraj waded into the Zimbabwe attack with a flurry of boundaries on the on-side and kept piercing the cover cordon with some heavy punches irrespective of the length of the ball.

It had looked much different in the first half though. Zimbabwe withstood the loss of two wickets in the fourth over and proceeded towards a healthy total. Andy Flower was back in his usual role of playing the saviour and started resurrecting the innings with Dion Ebrahim.

Ajit Agarkar and Zaheer Khan were quite impressive in their opening spells though the former stood out for some excellent work in the latter half of the innings as well. Agarkar extracted bounced from the apparently benign track and forced the in-form Alistair Campbell into a premature glide towards third-man which landed in the lap of first slip.

However, Andy weathered the early Indian charge with Ebrahim and set about reconstructing the innings. He was characteristically cunning and imaginative in accumulating runs and the reverse sweep was very much on show with debutant Murali Kartik being the principal sufferer.

Kartik did well initially by restricting Grant when the right-hander tried to unsettle him by stepping down the track but succumbed to the guiles of Andy. The left-hander notched up his 48th ODI fifty and while doing so, shattered the rhythm of Kartik by being consistently unorthodox.

The Flower brothers blossomed by adding 96 in 107 balls for the fourth wicket but just as it seemed that they would take Zimbabwe to safety, India struck back. The credit for this goes to Indian skipper Sourav Ganguly who stayed positive throughout and rotated all his strike bowlers in order to achieve the breakthrough.

It was Harbhajan Singh who lured Grant into an ambitious heave over lone-on where Dinesh Mongia ran in a good ten yards to take a good catch and Zaheer sent back Andy almost immediately to stifle the Zimbabwe march. Andy, who edged one low to the left of Ajay Ratra, made 89 in 107 balls with six fours.

It seemed as if Zimbabwe will fall well short of a respectable target but skipper Stuart Carlisle stroked 40 off 33 balls to ensure a challenging total. And it seemed as if it was enough.

The Indian chase was in doldrums with Sourav, Mongia and V.V.S. Laxman warming the bench by the 13th over and things were still pretty gloomy when Dravid fell in the 32nd. The lower middle-order had not contributed much in the recent past so there was every reason to prepare for the worse but Yuvraj and Kaif showed they have come of age by guiding India home.

Yuvraj was the certain choice for the MoM award for his unbeaten 80 (60 balls, 1x6, 8x4), while Kaif contributed an invaluable 68 (101 balls, 3x4).


Calcutta, March 16: 
The next ICC chief will be from the sub-continent. Then, three of the five Elite Panel Match Referees are from the region as also two of the eight Elite Panel umpires. The influential Cricket Committee (Playing) chairman, too, is from the sub-continent.

Ehsan Mani; Ranjan Madugalle, Gundappa Vishwanath and Wasim Raja; Srinivas Venkatraghavan and Asoka De Silva; Sunil Gavaskar… Each one of them has a significant role.

Moreover, yesterday, India pulled off a sensational ‘win’ when the Executive Board agreed to reconstitute the unilaterally-appointed Referees’ Commission.

It’s the most firm pointer yet to where actual power within the ICC rests. In any case, it’s already been established that the sponsors’ queue is longest in a series/tournament where India has a stake.

That Sourav Ganguly and Co. may not be the best advertisement for consistency is quite another matter.

Today, then, it’s in everybody’s interest — the ICC included — not to be on the wrong side of the sub-continent, specifically India. If somebody still had a doubt, it would have been cleared in pretty Cape Town.

In the lead-up to the two-day Board meeting, which concluded this evening, there was some talk that BCCI chief Jagmohan Dalmiya could ‘misuse’ this financial clout.

However, despite having the numbers on his side, Dalmiya never himself spoke of forcing a split. This “positive approach,” as somebody in the fraternity put it, contributed to India gaining even Australia’s support.

Traditionally seen as an England-New Zealand ally, within the ICC, this shift on Australia’s part has been stunning.

“Look, we are part of the ICC… Indeed, I’ve often spoken of everybody being members of one family… That hasn’t changed but, yes, we did make an issue of what definitely wasn’t right,” Dalmiya, clearly the man of the moment, told The Telegraph this morning.

[Incidentally, it was around this time five years ago that the Board unanimously voted to appoint Dalmiya as the ICC’s first president, doing away with the chairman’s post. He held office till June 2000.]

Now that president Malcolm Gray, in particular, has (hopefully) learnt a lesson, the sub-continent won’t be treated as just another region in the ICC’s fold.

Of course, it is to be seen just how this ‘change’ translates on the ground, so to say, but the immediate beneficiaries could be Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

One understands the next ICC KnockOut tournament — re-named the ICC Champions Trophy — will be awarded to Lanka, while Bangladesh may get the U-19 World Cup’s next edition.

Meanwhile, as was indicated in these columns both yesterday and today, India didn’t press for official (Test) recognition where last November’s Centurion game is concerned.

The approach would have been very different had the match either been won or drawn by India. As it turned out, South Africa triumphed by an innings and 73 runs.

Also, no Indian reached a milestone: The highest score being Shiv Sundar Das’ 48 in the second innings, with Jawagal Srinath registering the best figures — two for 94.

Eminently forgettable.


Hyderabad, March 16: 
Yuvraj Singh’s life in international cricket has been quite topsy-turvy and eventful. The robust left-hander from Punjab started yet another chapter in the senior league with a match-winning unbeaten 80 against Zimbabwe today, which brought India back from the brink of disaster and kept alive the series.

“Yes, I was under a bit of pressure and there was also this urge to prove a point,” said the Man of the Match. “I was labelled inconsistent and the team was 1-2 down, the situation was not ideal for any batsman making a comeback to international cricket.

“The instruction for me was to stay till the end and play along the ground. I told Mohammed Kaif that we formed the last recognised pair and had to be there till at least the 45th over. There was also this plan to stick to the basics. It clicked,” said Yuvraj. “I had been in good touch of late and striking the ball nicely. The pitch here was a bit slow so I was cautious to begin with but once I got used to the pace of the wicket, things became easier.

This was the best innings of my career, considering the team was under pressure and 1-2 down in the series,” said the hero of the night.

Sourav Ganguly, criticised very often for always backing Yuvraj, looked a man vindicated. Though he did not elaborate on the ‘backing’ bit, he was certainly full of praise. “He has always been a good batsman, saves 15 runs on the field and can bowl when required. A special player,” his assessment summed it up.

Sourav clarified that the decision to keep Ajay Ratra behind the stumps ahead of Rahul Dravid was taken in the morning. “It seemed there would be some turn there, so we decided to field a specialist wicketkeeper.”

Zimbabwe skipper Stuart Carlisle felt he was quite happy after his team posted 240 and added it was not short of what they had thought of. “We were quite confident at the break and the next plan was to pick up early wickets which we did. But the partnership between Dravid and Mohammed Kaif steadied the Indian boat and after that, Yuvraj took the game away from us. “It was a superb effort, but at least two of our bowlers did not bowl well,” said Carlisle. “It’s back to the drawing board for us,” he signed off.


Hyderabad, March 16: 
Cricket fever has gripped all of Charminar City save a few individuals. One of them, quite a landmark in this part of the country, is silently shuttling it out to keep pace with the best in the business. No points for guessing that is: Pullela Gopichand.

His defence of the All-England crown ended in tears, but a true champion never lets that dictate terms in the quest for excellence and Gopichand is doing just that.

An out and out humble person and polite almost to a fault, Gopichand had an exclusive chat with The Telegraph at the Lal Bahadur Shastri Indoor Complex this morning. He spoke about a variety of things, ranging from how difficult it is for an Indian aspiring to do well in badminton, to how complex the modern game has become.

To begin with, Gopichand stated the obvious — that he lacks sparring partners in the country, forcing him to train in countries good at the game like Indonesia, Malaysia, China and Denmark.

“Even in these places, it is getting difficult as the local associations are becoming increasingly reluctant to let someone from another country to train with their players.

“There is no doubt that your game gets better as you play with superior players but it’s getting difficult now. So I have to make do with playing in countries like Germany and England,” Gopichand said.

After becoming the second Indian, after Prakash Padukone, to win the All-England title last year, it’s not been smooth sailing for Gopichand, though he is not entirely unhappy with his performance.

“Yes, I haven’t won a title after that but didn’t do too badly either. I have been reaching the quarters and semis and am currently ranked fourth in the world. That’s not bad going since I have managed to stay close to the top,” he explained.

A fracture to the right ankle impeded his progress but it has healed now. “That injury kept me out for some time. After that, you need to train at high speed for about six weeks and I didn’t get that time,” he said, about his recent second-round exit from the big one at Birmingham.

Gopichand feels the change in the points system has led to a kind of unpredictability in badminton and that’s why the top guns are not being able to fire as expected.

“The game has become a lot more open. The new system has thrown up a host of new champions and you get a new one in almost every tournament. The big ones like Hendrawan and Peter Gade have slipped down the rankings with one point here and there making all the difference, the game has become unpredictable.”

Though Gopichand says he is comfortable with the new format, he doesn’t mind a shift back to the old one. “The international governing body is contemplating a change. The new system was experimental and it’s not good to have a new champion after every tournament since the game needs stars. This is not happening in the new format.”

Asked how life has changed after the All-England triumph, Gopichand said he is getting recognised a little more frequently. “Maybe signing a few more autographs. Things have become little hectic actually,” he added, flashing his million-dollar grin.

About his immediate aim, Gopichand said he is focussing on the Commonwealth and Asian Games. “The Asian Games is a key tournament, almost like the world championship. It offers a great chance to compete with the best and there is always this motivation to do well for the country.”

Goipchand says his tryst with the game began amid traditional discouragement from his middle-class family, which thought studies were clearly the safer option.

“But I was in love with the game and at 17, I decided that I was going to play badminton. Come what may. I can’t even think of leaving it and will continue as long as the body permits,” said the 28-year-old.

“It gives me great satisfaction that I have been able to do what I like most. For me, the hours I spend behind it is not hard work. People talk about things like sacrifice in the life of a sportsman but for me it’s not like that. I enjoy it, so there is no sacrifice, for me.”

If devotion is one factor behind success, you have some in Gopichand there.

There had to be this question whether he sometimes felt neglected with the growing cricket frenzy. Gopichand replied with a ‘drop shot’ that stopped the topic there. “I think about it only when I am asked about it.”

He admits the Indian federation has not done what it should have to popularise the game, especially after his success. “There could have been a few international tournaments in the country, there would certainly have been a lot of interest with me playing in India against some top players of the world.”

He agrees that pursuing a career in badminton in India is quite like swimming against the tide with impediments aplenty and too few solutions. But then, those who love to swim don’t mind going against the tide.


Calcutta, March 16: 
Early this year, world junior girls’ champion Koneru Humpy had decided to give this year’s Goodricke Open the skip. With two men’s GM norms under her belt she along with her father and coach K. Ashok had planned to play a series of tournaments in Hungary. But then, she hit a bad patch and withdrew from a closed GM tournament after scoring one point from seven games.

Humpy’s loss was Calcutta’s gain. The organisers, Alekhine Chess Club once again requested her to participate in this strongest Open in Asia. This time, she relented. At 14 years 11 and-a-half months, she must have realised that if she needs to take a shot at Judith Polgar’s record of getting the men’s GM title at 15 years and five months it has to be in this meet.

Though Humpy normally is unaffected by media attention, when she sits at the board tomorrow, the pressure will definitely be on her. The next 11 days could well decide the course of Indian chess history.

Despite the confirmation of 19 GMs this year’s Goodricke has lost some of it’s sheen in the absence of a star Grandmaster. While top seed Aexie Alexandrov of Belarus has a rating of 2645, second seed, Aleksander Motilev of Russia is the only other player in the 2600 bracket with a rating of 2639.

The organisers, it is learnt, tried hard for Boris Spassky to take part, but the former world champion reportedly refused because he thought the Goodricke was “too strong a meet today, and I am not getting any younger.”

The Indian challenge will be spear-headed by Krishnan Sasikiran who is currently on a roll. He was a clear champion in the Raipur International GM tournament which concluded yesterday. Sasikiran has, in fact, won the last five tournaments he has participated in-a-row. From his present rating of 2569 Sasikiran is likely to take his rating to 2625.Sasikiran has a rare tenacity and sheer will to win which might throw up the first Indian champion in the Goodricke.

Meanwhile, Abhijit Kunte confirmed his participation yesterday, taking the number of Indian GMs in the fray to three. Kunte’s participation adds strength to the Indian challenge. IM R.B. Ramesh, with two GM norms was the other last minute entry. Sorely missed, however, will be GM Pentalya Harikrishna and Surya Sekhar Ganguly, who have dropped out due to their examinations. Local star Neelotpal Das, too, has opted out on similar grounds.

Sandipan Chanda, who has joined ONGC recently, will be looking for his third and final GM norm here. Sandipan, who confirmed his first two norms in the last two Goodricke meets, narrowly missed his third norm in the Raipur GM tournament. Requiring a last round win against GM Eshan Ghaem Maghami of Iran, he faltered and lost. The Goodricke, though, has been a happy hunting ground for him as he has achieved both the norms in the last two meets.

Apart from Humpy, city-based Nisha Mohata — the only Indian to reach the second round of the world women’s championship — will be seen in action along with Aarthie Ramaswamy and Swati Ghate.

The 15-year-old, Somak Palit of GNCA could well be the surprise of the tournament. In the Asian Open held in Bikaner in February he confirmed his maiden IM norm. He beat two Grandmasters — Dibyendu Barua and Eshan Ghayem Maghami — while drawing with Kunte and Harikrishna.

Meanwhile, GM Mohamad Al-Modiahki of Qatar withdrew from the meet today. In another development, former national under-10 boys’ champion Rahul Sangma has been included today.


Calcutta, March 16: 
Mohun Bagan Club have demanded a full-fledged inquiry into the role of Rapid Action Force (RAF) personnel who went into overdrive at the Salt Lake Stadium yesterday soon after the NFL match between Mohun Bagan and ITI ended in a 2-2 draw.

“The way they (RAF) went on the rampage, not even sparing kids and women, it’s a big blow to football in this city,” club secretary Anjan Mitra said today. “We are writing to the chief minister demanding an inquiry and punishment of the guilty.”

Some of the Mohun Bagan fans, unhappy with ITI’s late equaliser, threw stones and bottles at the ITI bench. Instead of spotting the culprits and bringing them to book, RAF personnel lathicharged people at random injuring several innocent people.

If needed, Mohun Bagan will approach East Bengal Club and the IFA to strengthen their case against police excesses. “I spoke to East Bengal official Manas Mukherjee who condemned the incident,” Mitra said.

It was also announced that the club would stand by Pradip Dewan, the man who received the most serious injury. He has been admitted to the Nilratan Sarkar Hospital with a battered limb.


Calcutta, March 16: 
Eastern Railway moved into the CAB league championship play-off semi-finals with a three-wicket win over Calcutta Customs.

Chasing 233, Souvik Mukherjee spearheaded the railwaymen’s effort with 98 while Diptendu Mahata chipped in with 52.

Mohun Bagan began their quarter final on a strong note, piling up 400 for six on Day I against Shyambazar. The innings was built around Sanjib Goel’s 125. Subhamoy Das and Amitava Banerjee chipped in with half-centuries.


Customs 232. Eastern Railway 233/7 (Souvik Mukherjee 98, Diptendu Mahata 52, O.P. Tewari 39; Anup Das 4/74). Eastern Railway won by 3 wkts.

Mohun Bagan 400/6 (Sanjib Goel 125, Subhamoy Das 69, Amitava Banerjee 60; Anirban Chatterjee 3/100) vs Shyambazar.

Park after Phadkar

The New Alipore Block O children’s park will be named after former Test allrounder, the Late Dattu Phadkar. The formal naming ceremony takes place tomorrow. Phadkar played 31 Test matches, scoring 1,229 runs and capturing 62 wickets.

BHA League

Calcutta Rangers notched up a 2-1 win over Wari in a BHA League first division group B tie today. Chotanagpur RC recorded an identical win over Behala SA. In second division, Khalsa Sporting beat Ranganathpur Union 2-0 while Aikya Sammilani beat Real Sports Friends 1-0.

Bhupathi-Gambill out

Mahesh Bhupathi and American Jan-Michael Gambill bowed out of the Indian Wells Masters Series meet in Round 2. Zimbabwe’s Wayne Black and Kevin Ullyett beat them 7-6 (7-4), 6-2 according to information received here.    

Calcutta, March 16: 
The brave hearted filly Touch of Silver produced a gutsy performance in the hands of jockey Prakash Bhonsle to lift the 2,800m Calcutta St Leger — her fourth classic of the season, today. Although suffering from constipation thus off her routine feed for a couple of days, the 2-10 hot-favourite easily won by a long neck from Alamito who was handled intelligently by Cristopher Alford. Trained by Daniel David, the Serious Spender-Corviglia daughter had won the Calcutta Derby, the Oaks and the 1,000 Guineas earlier in the season.The day was, however, ruled by outsiders.


1. Cradle of The Deep Handicap 1,200m: (3-2-5-4) Alborada (Prakash) 1; Tequila Shot (Shanker) 2; Freedom Warrior (C. Alford) 3; Beau Bruno (Brij S.) 4. Won by: 3/4; 1-1/4; 1-1/2; (1-13.9). Tote: Win Rs 28; Place: 19; 25; Quinella: 77; Tanala: 321. Fav: Alborada (3). Winner trained by Daniel D.

2. Long Tom Handicap 1,100m: (7-2-4-3) Glass Slipper (M. Reuben) 1; Secret Adversary (B. Gurang) 2; Simply Monarch (Prakash) 3; Schumacher (Asghar) 4. Won by: 3/4; 1/2; Nk; (1-7). Tote: Win Rs 193; Place: 27; 28; 13; Quinella: 848; Tanala: 5,010. Fav: Val Rouge (6). Winner trained by J. Stephens.

3. Goldgainer Cup 1,100m: (1-2-6-5) Lady Shirley (Islam) 1; Calcuttan (Shanker) 2; Heaven’s Blessing (A. P. Singh) 3; Castle Moon (Gowli) 4. Won by: 1/2; 1-1/4; Hd; (1-7.7). Tote: Win Rs 97; Place: 20; 11; 21; Quinella: 57; Tanala: 734. Fav: Calcuttan (2). Winner trained by Rodrigues.

4. Air Force Cup 1,400m: (1-5-2-7) Gold Buck (Shanker) 1; Sadaf (Rabani) 2; Ispahan (Rutherford) 3; Raaz (M. Reuben) 4. Won by: Hd; 3/4; 3/4; (1-28.6). Tote: Win Rs 90; Place: 25; 32; 15; Quinella: 1,390; Tanala: 11,451. Fav: Soviet Port (3). Winner trained by Bath.

5. Calcutta St Leger 2,800m: (3-1-2) Touch of Silver (Prakash) 1; Alamito (C. Alford) 2; Calculate (Shanker) 3. Won by: Nk; 2-1/2; (3-32). Tote: Win Rs 12; Quinella: 12. Fav: Touch of Silver (3). Winner trained by Daniel D.

6. Pennant Handicap 1,200m: (2-5-4-7) Revolution (E. Smith) 1; Andrada (C. Alford) 2; On The Bit (M. Reuben) 3; Leading Conquest (Brij S.) 4. Not run: Pearl Dragon (1). Won by: 3; 2; 1; (1-12.7). Tote: Win Rs 132; Place: 41; 13; Quinella: 97; Tanala: 1,072. Fav: Gallant Romeo (3). Winner trained by D. Karki.

7. Aspirant Handicap 1,200m: (7-8-1-6) River Melody (Prakash) 1; Sweet Paintedlady (Upadhya) 2; Assailer (C. Alford) 3; Dancing Rhythm (Shanker) 4. Not run: Mahika’s Pet (12). Won by: 8-3/4; 1-1/4; SH; (1-14). Tote: Win Rs 38; Place: 16; 16; 14; Quinella: 74; Tanala: 377. Fav: Assailer (1). Winner trained by Daniel D.

Jackpot: Rs 52,756; (C) Rs 5,105.

Treble: (i) Rs 10,089; (ii) Rs 573.


Mumbai, March 16: 
While the Cooji Katrak-trainee Whispering Shadows, with Pesi Shroff in the saddle, may win the Breeders’ Fillies Championship in Mumbai on Sunday, Zurbaran, to be ridden by M. Narredu, is fancied to lift the Colts’ Championship.


2 pm: Aurelia 1. Rosetta 2. Good Thinking 3.

2.30 pm: Mille Fiori 1. Amazing Fighter 2.

3 pm: Accademia 1. Recognition 2. Safari Girl 3.

3.30 pm: Battle Star 1. Astor Place 2. Silver Blue 3.

4 pm: Saytarra 1. Pure Cream 2. Sanaga 3.

4.30 pm: Whispering Shadows 1. Our Dynasty 2. Priceless 3.

5 pm: Zurbaran 1. L’Avenir 2. Aldeburgh 3.

5.30 pm: Anacita 1. Teaser 2. Moment of Pleasure 3.

6 pm: Bearer Bond 1. Courageous 2. King’s Crest 3.

Day’s Best: Saytarra

Double: Mille Fiori & Accademia


Bangalore, March 16: 
Ridden by Ruzaan, Ganapathy’s Star Chieftan won the Hemavathi Cup today here.


1. B. A. R. I. Plate, Div-II 1,400m: (8-4-6) Trajan (Shakti) 1; Mythical Star 2; Red Zeppelin 3. Won by: 2-1/2; 2-3/4; (1-29). Tote: Win Rs 17; Place: 11; 15; 22; Forecast: 27; Quinella: 22; Tanala: 72 & 51. Fav: Trajan (8).

2. Kalinadi Plate 1,200m: (7-3-1) Tassha (Ghous) 1; Fugleman 2; Luca Brassi 3. Won by: 3/4; 3; (1-17.6). Tote: Win Rs 334; Place: 25; 11; 23; Forecast: 358; Quinella: 50; Tanala: 927 & 619. Fav: Fugleman (3).

3. B. A. R. I. Plate, Div-I 1,400m: (8-2-7) Cool Jazz (Shroff) 1; Aerographer 2; Soaring Eagle 3. Not run: Impressionist (3). Won by: 2-1/4; 1-1/4; (1-28.6). Tote: Win Rs 14; Place: 11; 21; 16; Forecast: 52; Quinella: 23; Tanala: 83 & 26. Fav: Cool Jazz (8).

4. Sardar D. Devaraj Urs Memorial Plate 1,600m: (6-2-3) Three To Count (Appu) 1; Pride Valley 2; Crystal Delight 3. Won by: 1-1/4; 2-3/4; (1-41.9). Tote: Win Rs 100; Place: 23; 14; 25; Forecast: 238; Quinella: 161; Tanala: 1,189 & 621. Fav: Pride Valley (2).

5. Hemavathi Cup 1,400m: (9-2-8) Star Chieftan (Ruzaan) 1; Blue Hare 2; Spark of Life 3. Won by: 1/2; SH; (1-26.7). Tote: Win Rs19; Place: 13; 19; 21; Forecast: 53; Quinella: 42; Tanala: 156 & 67. Fav: Star Chieftan (9).

6. Kanteerava Cup 1,200m: (2-8-5) Soviet Bay (Mrs Storai) 1; King’s Star 2; Brora 3. Not run: Jai Bharath (7). Won by: 1-3/4; Nk; (1-15). Tote: Win Rs 73; Place: 21; 14; 24; Forecast: 281; Quinella: 94; Tanala: 670 & 413. Fav: Secret Halo (4).

7. Saddle Up Plate 1,400m: (7-4-1) Cool Camp (Ramesh) 1; Special Request 2; Anchor 3. Won by: Nk; 2-1/4; (1-29.2). Tote: Win Rs 63; Place: 20; 17; 13; Forecast: 178; Quinella: 88; Tanala: 365 & 202. Fav: Anchor (1). (Note: The winner survived an objection)

8. Devarayanadurga Stakes 1,200m: (5-4-3) Auric (Marshall) 1; Save The Day 2; Guernica 3. Won by: 1/2; 2-1/2; (1-16.6). Tote: Win Rs 104; Place: 26; 22; 14; Forecast: 744; Quinella: 231; Tanala: 1,217 & 357. Fav: Guernica (3).

Jackpot: Rs 1,56,741; (C) Rs


Mini jackpot: Rs 29,790.

Treble: (i) Rs 201; (ii) Rs 4,930.


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