Handsome purse for top guns
Bhratri seal fourth spot
4th term for Ummerkoya
Bagan begin with scrappy win over TFA
Fiasco not to affect future ties
Arjun champion
Pune Racing/ Oath Fulfilled may be hard to beat
Pune Racing/ Machrihanish trounces rivals

Calcutta, Oct. 13: 
First came the announcement that graded payments was being put on hold. Then, Board president Jagmohan Dalmiya himself clarified the process was “irreversible” and “only the finer details” needed to be worked out.

In a nice gesture, Dalmiya telephoned Anil Kumble, in South Africa, to convey the “irreversible bit.” It’s Kumble’s presentation (specifically on behalf of the Indian cricketers), after all, which will form the basis of graded payments at the international level.

[Incidentally, former India manager Prof. Ratnakar Shetty, of Mumbai, has done much of the interacting on behalf of the Board.]

The recent presentation — a copy of which is with The Telegraph — makes for very interesting reading.



The benefits of the success of the game must filter down and be enjoyed by a larger number of people rather than the select top few.

The strength of the team, on the field, is dependent on the pressure that comes from the next set of players and how well prepared and ready they are to take over in case of injury and loss of form.

By having a formal (written) arrangement with a pool of players, the Board provides them security for a year and gives them money by which they can feel rewarded (and secure) and work hard on their game and fitness. They will be ready for a call-up whenever required.

Young players can now hope to get into the players’ pool, then work harder to put pressure on the playing XI instead of worrying about their financial insecurities. Thus, it benefits a few more players than just those who play all the time.

Today, with globalisation and competition, the public sector and private sector companies which earlier employed cricketers, are very reluctant to do so and job opportunities for our young cricketers have dwindled. A lot of them are opting for other fields at a crucial age of 19-21 years.

Children, outside just the elite few, might also view cricket as an alternative career/profession, thereby ensuring their continued interest in the game.

This system helps recognise the players’ seniority and performance, while also providing security. It will also inspire young players to achieve more and aim higher for better rewards.

This system rewards players for actually playing and doing well.

The Board can regulate the fitness of the players in the pool, at regular intervals, and also control the amount of cricket they play. For example, those wanting to play County cricket and (league) cricket in the Counties, for money, can be dissuaded thus helping them work harder at their game and resting at home. This will not only benefit them, but also the team.

As there is a lot more cricket being played today, it calls for a larger pool of players to choose from. This will ensure the best players’ careers are planned and prolonged and that they are fit and available for all the important games.

This system compensates a player when injured — minimum basic (contracted) fee will be paid.

A gradation system allows for all the above mentioned issues without compromising a player’s earning capacity in what is a short career span compared to other professions.


(For purposes of calculation, an average of 12 Tests and 40 ODIs, annually, taken into account)

The structure shall have three tiers: A, B, C.

Total (suggested) pool of contracted players: 25. (Exact number, though, to be decided by the Board.

The pool to consist of 5-6 A level, 7-8 B level and the rest C level players.

All players in the pool shall have a formal arrangement for one year for the first year. Arrangement to be reviewed (after the first year) for a minimum period of two years for A&B level players and one year for the C level ones.

The basic (contracted) fee for a C level player shall be Rs 14.8 lakh (Rs 40,000 for each of the Tests and Rs 25,000 for every ODI) — rounded-off to Rs 15 lakh.

The second tier (B) will have a fixed fee of Rs 30 lakh.

The A level players will have a fixed fee of Rs 60 lakh.

Placement in the different levels will be based on the utility of the player and this shall be decided by a special committee formed by the Board.

At the end of the first year, a player can be promoted or demoted by the special committee.


Seven slabs in Tests: Minimum of 1-10 (A match fee of Rs 80,000 for every Test) with a maximum of 126-150 (Rs 4.5 lakh for each Test).

Six slabs in ODIs: Minimum of 1-75 (A match fee of Rs 70,000 for every ODI) with a maximum of 376-450 (Rs 3.5 lakh for each ODI).

The match fee for a reserve player (12th-14th/15th) will be 50 per cent of the prevalent fee according to his gradation.


Any player outside the pool, who is inducted into the squad, shall only get the match fee based on the slab of gradation. He will not be entitled to any pool (basic contracted) fee.

The player shall automatically get a C level graded fee after he has played either four Tests or 12 ODIs.

His fee will be proportionate to his level of gradation.

Note: A bonus package/structure has also been proposed. For instance, a Test win will be worth Rs 12 lakh, a series victory Rs 25 lakh. Similarly, an ODI win will be worth Rs 6 lakh, a series/tournament victory Rs 15 lakh.


Calcutta, Oct. 13: 
An opportunistic early goal by Dipankar Biswas helped Bhratri Sangha beat a fighting Port Trust 1-0 and claim the fourth place in the Super Division of the IFA League at Howrah Stadium today.

The win ensured entry for Shabbir Ali’s team to the National League second division.

In an open match, which saw both teams in with a chance of making it to the second tier of the country’s premier club competition, players often lost temper. This forced referee Sukriti Dutta to send off Bhratri Sangha’s Nilanjan Guha and Pradip Indu of Port Trust.

However, the game didn’t lose pace and the portmen — despite their inspired efforts, particularly in the second session — could not make up for the early deficit.

Dipankar, out of a melee, knocked in a low Abdul Sadique corner from the right and his second-minute effort made all the difference.

Bhratri Sangha finished the Super Division behind champions Mohun Bagan, runners-up East Bengal and Tollygunge Agragami with 22 points — four points ahead of their opponents.

Port Trust dominated proceedings but lack of penetration in the attacking third and poor finishing kept them waiting. Indu’s 61st-minute header, which hit the crosspiece and substitute Amar Pyne’s miscued shot from close just minutes before the final whistle, should, therefore, be construed as exceptions.

Nilanjan and Pradip were given marching orders for second bookable offence in the 65th minute and last minute, respectively. Following Nilanjan’s departure, Bhratri Sangha retreated to defence and Soumen Sarkar replaced the match’s lone scorer, adding strength to their rearguard.

Target achieved: Shabbir

“I set my target from tournament to tournament. First it was a place in the championship leg and then qualification for the National League. Both targets achieved, I’ll now try to advance to the first division,” Shabbir said after the match.


Bhratri Sangha: Avijit Mondal, Momocha Singh, Arun Malhotra, Nilanjan Guha, Babun Kar, Bastab Roy (Prakash Kolay, 60), Ifiani, Safa Abdul Hamid, Dipankar Biswas (Soumen Sarkar, 66), Abdul Sadique (Arup Sarkar), Christian Okolonko.

Port Trust: Sandip Guha, Shib Sankar Chowdhury, Bijoy Pal, Rabi Karmakar, Srimanta Das, Koushik Prasad, Amit Roy, Shantanu Chakraborty (Amar Pyne, 71), Madhusudan Majumdar, Sandip Ghosh, Pradip Indu.

Referee: Sukriti Dutta.


Calcutta, Oct. 13: 
Incumbent general secretary P.T. Ummerkoya and his panel retained their stronghold on the All India Chess Federation (AICF) for another term here today.

At the annual general meeting, the elections finally boiled down only to seven candidates for the six vice-presidential posts. The rest of the posts were decided uncontested.

This will be Ummerkoya’s fourth term as secretary.

N. Srinivasan of Tamil Nadu is the new president. This is in keeping with the secretary’s idea of roping in industrialists for the cause of the sport in the country. Srinivasan is the managing director of India Cements.

Col Mohan Singh of Rajasthan sent in his withdrawal form.

All vice-presidential posts also went to the panel of the incumbent. Ramachandra, Karnataka Chess Association administrator, who had proposed himself for a vice-presidential post, finally did not turn up, but neither did the withdrawal form reach returning officer Manuel Aaron. Ramachandra, thus, ‘contested’ and got two votes.

Of the total of 62, the number of votes polled was 53. Himachal Pradesh, Maharashtra, Central Revenue Sports Board and Karnataka did not send representatives and one vote was declared invalid (name not disclosed). V.R. Bobba, of Andhra Pradesh Chess Association, withdrew his candidature. His strange explanation was “I was not aware Ummerkoya was running.”

Ummerkoya later said this was because rumours had been floated regarding a so-called government directive limiting sports body office bearers’ terms to three. There has been no such dirtective, he said.

All six joint secretaries were elected unopposed.

There was police security at the venue, but it seemed entirely unnecessary.


President: N. Srinivasan (TNCA).

Vice-Presidents: U.L. Asarpota (Gujarat), P.C. Chaturvedi (UPCA), S.L. Harsh (Rajasthan), V.K. Rathi (MPCA), Ramola Chakraborty (WBCA), D.V. Sundar (TN).

Gen. Secretary: P.T. Ummerkoya (AKCA).

Joint secretaries: Bharat Singh Chauhan (Delhi), A.R. Khan (Bihar), Pradeep Kumar Singh (Assam), Suhas Ansodkar (Goa), Thanhilira (Mizoram), Vinod Sharma (Punjab).

Treasurer: Soumen Majumdar (MPCA).

Serious allegation

Reacting to the trouble that had erupted in New Delhi on September 1, the general body, in a meeting after the elections, passed a resolution to move a complaint on fraud against R.K. Singh, IPS, “and his relative” Dheraj Raghuvanshi.

It was resolved that the Union home minister should be informed of the above two’s alleged complicity in “trying to misappropriate AICF funds by printing fake letterhead and stamps of the AICF and writing to the State Bank of Travancore, Calicut, in this connection, falsely claiming that he and his relative Dheraj Raghuvanshi are president and secretary of the AICF, respectively.”

Ummerkoya said: “This happened a week after the September 1 fiasco. The bank manager was flummoxed and immediately froze our account.

“I have seen the letter that was sent, and it was a forgery. We had to prove our genuine credentials.”

Asked why he did not immediately approach the police, Ummerkoya said he wanted to get the entire general body backing him on this first. “Hence I waited for this meeting.” Asked about the whereabouts of the two, the secretary said the two have not been heard of since.


Guwahati, Oct. 13: 
Calcutta giants Mohun Bagan notched up a scrappy 1-0 win over Tata Football Academy in a quarter final league match of the Bordoloi Trophy at the Nehru Stadium here tonight.

Abdulateef Seriki scored the match-winner in the 81st minute to seal the match in Bagan’s favour.

Playing their first match of the tournament, under floodlights, Mohun Bagan found the sprightly young TFA players a tough opposition.

However, due to some poor finishing TFA ended on the losing side despite dominating the first half and most of the second.

Tommorrow, Rajpracha FC will play FC Kochin in another quarter final league match.


Calcutta, Oct. 13: 
The SE Palmeiras fiasco involving the 107th IFA Shield final, East Bengal club and the IFA, will not see the end of footballing relations that the city may have developed with the Latin American powerhouse.

Speaking from Goa, La Martin Fernandes da Silva of Sports Network International, which arranged for the Brazilian team to participate in the Shield, said that “doors have not been closed on foreign participation,” but he also pointed out that there should be a modality built in that could guarantee any visiting team that such confusions do not happen again.

As is learnt, the Palmeiras outfit and its officials have already moved concerned people to try and lodge a complaint with Fifa. From this end, the IFA has also sent the relevant video cassette to the world body. Hence this issue is now hanging fire in the international arena.


Chandigarh, Oct. 13: 
Despite Harmeet Kahlon’s late fightback, Arjun Singh emerged champion in the Chandigarh Open golf championship today.

Gurbazz Mann finished second at seven-under 281 but was relegated to seventh for his amateur status.

Final standings: 1. Arjun Singh (278); 2. K.S. Sibia(283); 3. Rajiv Kumar (284).


Pune, Oct. 13: 
A good second to Rambus over a mile circuit, despite his weight disadvantage, the Imtiaz Sait- trained Oath Fulfilled may be hard to toss in the 2,000m Nanoli Stud Pune Derby on Sunday. Rajinder partners the Wattlefield-Cuirie son.


1.45 pm: Suratha 1. Saytarra 2. Reflecting 3.

2.15 pm: Miss Sunshine 1. Paradise Dancer 2. Loretta 3.

2.45 pm: Opener 1. Auchinblae 2. Monte Carlo Magic 3.

3.15 pm: Gironde 1. Prince Nicholas 2. Ally McBeal 3.

3.45 pm: Palazzio 1. Roll of Dice 2. Angara 3.

4.15 pm: Oath Fulfilled 1. Judge Jules 2. The Pelican 3.

4.45 pm: Princess Gabriella 1. Valuepays 2. Silent Deal 3.

5.15 pm: Sanquirico 1. The Gladiator 2. Au Revoir 3.

Day’s Best: Palazzio

Double: Suratha & Oath Fulfilled


Pune, Oct. 13: 
In a comfortable lead at the half-way stage of the 1,600m trip, Machrihanish went on increasing the margin of her victory to lift the Squanderer Trophy by shade under 10 lengths from Run For Glory at the Pune races on Saturday. K. P. Appu partnered the Bezan Chenoy trained filly.


(With inter-state dividends)

1. Mohamedali Plate 2,000m: (3-8-5) Self Styled (Shroff) 1; Software Lady 2; Perfect Storm 3. Won by: 3-1/4; 1/2; (2-12.5). Tote: Win Rs 12; Place: 11; 33; 29; Quinella: 76; Tanala: 524. Fav: Self Styled (3).

2. Ghazab Trophy 1,800m: (2-3-5) El Campeador (M. Narredu) 1; Iron Mask 2; Zaraius 3. Not run: Sanamji (8). Won by: Dist; 2-1/2; (1-55.8). Tote: Win Rs 48; Place: 16; 50; 90; Quinella: 329; Tanala: 11,814. Fav: Auditor (1).

3. Squanderer Trophy 1,600m: (4-3-1) Machrihanish (Appu) 1; Run For Glory 2; Torres 3. Won by: 9-1/2; 5-1/2; (1-41.7). Tote: Win Rs 17; Place: 15; 44; Quinella: 117; Tanala: 665. Fav: Machrihanish (4).

4. Silver Fire Plate 2,000m: (7-6-2) Laurels (Appu) 1; Thunderlite 2; Fine Arrow 3. Won by: 3-3/4; Dist; (2-9). Tote: Win Rs 161; Place: 19; 12; 32; Quinella: 66; Tanala: 2,090. Fav: Thunderlite (6).

5. Cartier Million Plate 1,200m: (7-1-3) Natural Grace (Sandeep) 1; Zeisha 2; Silver Blue 3. Won by: Nk; 6-1/2; (1-14.4). Tote: Win Rs 74; Place: 22; 16; 26; Quinella: 162; Tanala: 3,503. Fav: Zeisha (1).

6. Clyde Star Plate 1,100m: (4-2-11) Shahandeh (Chauhan) 1; Crown Affair 2; War ‘N’ Peace 3. Won by: 4-3/4; 7-1/2; (1-8.1). Tote: Win Rs 48; Place: 22; 15; 153; Quinella: 85; Tanala: 5,922. Fav: Crown Affair (2).

7. Alphabatum Plate 1,100m: (12-3-7) Frequency (Chauhan) 1; Bud Royale 2; Latest News 3. Won by: 1/2; 5; (1-9.9). Tote: Win Rs 21; Place: 14; 22; 84; Quinella: 67; Tanala: 2,355. Fav: Frequency (12).

8. Fairmont Plate, Div-I 1,200m: (3-4-1) Soviet Fire (Merchant) 1; Moira 2; Star of Century 3. Not run: Blushing Brave (13). Won by: 6-1/2; 4-3/4; (1-15.6). Tote: Win Rs 21; Place: 16; 53; 16; Quinella: 217; Tanala: 904. Fav: Star of Century (1).

9. Fairmont Plate, Div-II 1,200m: (5-12-10) Hiccups (H. Moses) 1; Blusheon 2; Partner Perfect 3. Won by: 4-3/4; Nk; (1-16.8). Tote: Win Rs 73; Place: 19; 27; 56; Quinella: 241; Tanala: 8,110. Fav: Stage Secret (8).

Jackpot: Rs 7,077; (C) Rs 515.

Treble: (i) Rs 953; (ii) Rs 4,944; (iii) Rs 351.


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