Indians on the brink of innings defeat
Leading by example, Sanath way
Sourav done in by the ‘wrong one’ again
Xu Jun a draw away from title
Prakash nets 3 out of Bagan’s 5
‘Meet on without India’
Another feather in Bula’s cap
Milkha no to Arjuna
Calcutta Races/ Ballet Master surprises
Mysore Races/ Mysore tips

 
 
INDIANS ON THE BRINK OF INNINGS DEFEAT 
 
 
FROM LOKENDRA PRATAP SAHI
 
Galle, Aug. 16: 
India 187 & 130/8
Sri Lanka 362

Frankly, there is nothing much to write home about.

Except, of course, that India barely avoided losing by an innings on the third day itself. That just once before (September 1985, Colombo) have India ever lost a Test to Sri Lanka. That captain Sourav Ganguly again failed to lead from the front. That it’s pointless poring over tomorrow’s weather report. Also, that this team may just as well be written off...

Sadly, character has been at an absolute premium.

Unless Jawagal Srinath, who has a suspected crack just above the left knuckles, can wield the bat (actually, first wear the gloves), the ongoing Rahul Dravid-Venkatesh Prasad partnership may at best only delay an early (and shameful) fourth-day finish to the first of three Tests.

In arrears by 175, India lost wickets with shocking regularity to be seven down for 120 when the day’s quota of overs was completed. That’s when Lanka claimed the additional half-hour (as a result was in the offing) and umpires Steve Bucknor and Asoka De Silva upheld their request.

Dravid, the Indian vice-captain, sought a “clarification” and even asked the umpires to reconsider. Both, however, stood firm and when Zaheer Khan fell to the very first delivery in that extra half-hour, it appeared defeat was inevitable this evening itself.

Mercifully, Dravid and Prasad survived 19 minutes, after which the umpires deemed light was insufficient.

It brought some relief to the Indians, but Lankan coach Dav Whatmore, for one, wasn’t amused. “The umpires had continued play till even longer yesterday...” Whatmore pointed out, puffing at yet another cigarette. Piqued, he continued: “Don’t we all know cricket is a funny game?”

Captain Sanath Jayasuriya, though, took the decision sportingly. “Look, victory will come when it is destined... I’m not complaining. In fact, when the Indian (second) innings began, I was simply looking to pick up around four wickets (today). Well, we already have eight in our bag,” Jayasuriya told The Telegraph.

The Lankan captain added: “I’m not the sort to get carried away... And, if I could add, I’m delighted our bowlers stuck to the gameplan of bowling one line. The secret for success, really, is to not err with the basics.”

Sourav has been devastated.

Speaking exclusively at the team hotel, the Indian captain blandly said: “What’s there for me to say? Everyone has seen our performance. At this point in time, I don’t wish to offer any comment.” Clearly, with little ‘recovery’ time between now and the second Test, in Kandy from Wednesday, Sourav must himself quickly get his act right.

Incidentally, had all gone well, the Indians would have headed to a nearby Taj resort for a 36-hour stay ahead of the second Test. Such plans have been shelved and the team will (as of now) reach Kandy on Saturday itself. Sensible that.

Sadagopan Ramesh, as usual, was the first to depart, playing the wrong (inside) line and allowing Lanka a breakthrough as early as the eighth over. Shiv Sundar Das, who otherwise was both compact and positive, then smashed a rising deivery (outside off) straight to point.

Next out was the sensibly batting Mohammed Kaif, who became the first of Muttiah Muralidharan’s four victims — caught bat-pad. Sourav, who expected Dilhara Fernando to bowl short, found himself out-thought and it’s not a bouncer which got the Indian captain. Sourav’s feet didn’t move quickly enough and he perished via an inside edge.

Cricket, today, is as much a game of the mind as it is of actual skill and full marks to Jayasuriya for reintroducing Fernando moments after Sourav came to the middle.

All this while, Dravid kept anchoring one end. It didn’t help, of course, when the home umpire adjudged Hemang Badani caught-behind (off Murali) when replays indicated the ball had made contact with the left-hander’s front pad. That wicket made it 73 for five. Samir Dighe, the plucky Harbhajan Singh and Zaheer followed...

The Test began on what then was a greentop, but Murali has already added seven wickets to his pre-series tally of 317. Indeed, the last three Tests (including the current one) at the Internatonal Stadium have seen his number of victims swell by all of 27.

It’s phenomenal.

Earlier in the day, the Lankan first innings ended 46 minutes after lunch and, from Kumar Sangakkara’s point of view, after his maiden Test century. Sangakkara, who came at No. 3 and survived a Dravid let-off on eight, was still seven short when last man Murali walked in.

Murali’s cavalier approach didn’t quite inspire confidence, in Sangakkara at least, but the wicketkeeper-batsman managed to overcome the 90s blues. Twice in the past, against South Africa (Centurion, 98) and versus England (Kandy, 95), had he tripped at the doorstep.

Sangakkara, however, wasn’t the only milestone-achiever. For India, Srinath returned a five or more wickets haul (in an innings) for the eighth time in 53 Tests.

The last such performance was against Zimbabwe, at the Kotla last November. That, this time, Srinath bowled with a suspected crack would rank this effort as among the more courageous anywhere.

“In the past, I’ve even bowled with a fracture... Nothing has shown up thus far, but let’s see what the next X-ray reveals,” Srinath remarked, adding that a “better line and length” made the difference this morning.

Resuming at 264 for three, Lanka lost Russell Arnold early, when he cut Prasad to gully. Thereafter, the second new ball (85th over, 283 for four) did the damage. It had worked wonders for Lanka, too, only India had already been under pressure when it was taken on the first evening.

Hashan Tillekaratne, playing his first Test in well over two years, wasn’t ever comfortable and became Srinath’s first scalp (overall second) with the second new ball.

Getting the ball to swing, Srinath quickly got Suresh Perera as well. At the other end, Zaheer picked up two wickets and, after lunch (taken at 330 for seven), Srinath got victims No. 4 and 5.

Sangakkara remained unbeaten on 105 (362 minutes, 226 balls, 13x4). He is hardly exceptional, yet the Indians can learn much from him.

   

 
 
LEADING BY EXAMPLE, SANATH WAY 
 
 
FROM LOKENDRA PRATAP SAHI
 
Galle, Aug. 16: 
It was during the 1996 World Cup, when he was adjudged the Most Valuable Player, that Sanath Jayasuriya earned the ‘Smiling Assassin’ nickname. Sure, the Sri Lankan captain doesn’t smile as much nowadays, but the assassin effect is very much there.

Out of form for aeons in Test cricket (a sub-20 average in the last series, against England), Jayasuriya regained touch with a vengeance yesterday, on Day II of the first Test here. His 111 came off 138 deliveries and in 193 minutes (16x4, 1x6).

While the Indians needed 244 minutes to reach their first 100 runs, Jayasuriya rocketed to his eighth Test century (third versus India) in 161 minutes, off only 105 balls. Nowadays, such incredible figures are associated with ODIs, not Tests.

[With the Indian cookie crumbling even quicker than the most fanatical Lankan fan had hoped, the ‘Smiling Assassin’ actually produced a match-winning innings. By delayed stumps on Day-III, today, India were on the verge of their first defeat at Lankan hands in 16 years.]

True, the Lankan captain was offered width which would cover the 45-kms between Galle and hometown Matara, but one still has to make capital of the opportunities. Neither the Indians’ length nor the line was right, and Jayasuriya repeatedly square-cut to almost damage the hoardings at the point boundary on either side.

Jawagal Srinath and Venkatesh Prasad, with 84 Test appearances between themselves, bowled to the captain’s strength and the team paid a heavy price.

In fact, Jayasuriya even sent Srinath over point for his only six. It was a shot worth travelling miles to see. He fell after being surprised by the extra bounce Zaheer Khan extracted but by then the Lankan captain had ensured all the pressure was on Sourav Ganguly’s shoulders.

Just as well that Zaheer got Jayasuriya as the previous two occasions that the captain crossed 100 against India, he scored 340 and 199 (both times during the 1997-98 series in Lanka).

Later, talking to The Telegraph, Jayasuriya acknowledged he was “relieved” at having overcome a bad patch. That, too, at a time when he simply had to lead from the front. It truly was a captain’s innings. But was batting actually as easy as he made it out to be?

Jayasuriya smiled: “Look, I played the way that comes naturally to me... It’s not that I took guard determined to score at almost a run each delivery. That’s something which happened though, yes, I had walked out in an absolutely positive frame of mind.”

According to Jayasuriya, priority No.1 for Lanka was to lose “as few wickets” as possible (yesterday) and to see off Srinath’s first spell (5-2-11-0). Both objectives were accomplished and, more important, Jayasuriya’s blazing innings gave somebody like Kumar Sangakkara immense confidence.

For Jayasuriya, momentum was a key element and his scorching pace made things so much easier for the rest. Yet, typically, the Lankan captain chose to talk of his bowlers who, earlier in the day, restricted India to within 200.

“Honestly, it’s no mean task limiting India to 187... Murali (Muttiah Muralidharan), as usual, was superb and in (Dilhara) Fernando, we have the makings of another very exciting match-winner. The pace he generated was terrific,” Jayasuriya remarked.

Pressed for a few more comments on his innings, he responded with a query of his own: “Will it suffice if I said I’m happy my knock has served the country well? I think the world knows that nothing gives me more satisfaction than helping Sri Lanka’s cause. So...”

It does appear Jayasuriya isn’t just content with having been adjudged the No. 1 player in the recent tri-series (won by Lanka). That’s quite ominous for India.

   

 
 
SOURAV DONE IN BY THE ‘WRONG ONE’ AGAIN 
 
 
FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
 
Galle, Aug. 16: 
The possibility of bad decisions is something cricketers must quickly get used to. Yet, it can get very frustrating if one batsman gets a few in fairly quick succession. That, too, when the ball isn’t exactly rolling his way.

To an extent, then, one has to sympathise with Indian captain Sourav Ganguly.

Sourav was on 15 during the first innings yesterday morning when an express snorter from Dilhara Fernando brushed his left shoulder before being taken by wicketkeeper Kumar Sangakkara.

The bowler, who had the best view, appealed as an afterthought and Sangakkara’s wasn’t the most enthusiastic either. However, home umpire Asoka de Silva felt the ball flicked the gloves and up went the dreaded index finger.

The Indian captain was initially too stunned to react but, then, walked off shaking his helmet-protected head in disbelief. Later, in the evening, an anguished Sourav asked The Telegraph: “But why does it always have to be me?”

There are no easy answers to such queries.

As it turned out, that one decision ensured the Indian innings folded quicker than most were praying it would. It didn’t, of course, help that Fernando was firing on all cylinders and made the Indian tail duck like never before in recent times.

Fernando returned career-best figures of five for 42, bettering five for 98 in Durban last December. Actually, the strapping Fernando ‘got’ Jawagal Srinath, as well, who retired with a knock just above the left knuckles. He did bowl and though the first X-ray hasn’t revealed a fracture, a crack is suspected.

Wicket-to-wicket, Fernando required just 23 balls, the lethal sequence beginning Tuesday evening, when Sanath Jayasuriya took the second new ball. For the record, the Indian first innings stretched till 55 minutes into the second morning.

After Fernando, it was the Sri Lankan captain’s turn to hog the limelight. Jayasuriya, in fact, made the most of the width provided even by the experienced Srinath and Venkatesh Prasad.

The Indians should, instead, have compelled Jayasuriya to come on the front foot and drive. While he raced to his eighth Test century, fellow-opener Maravan Atapattu and No. 3 Sangakkara played the supporting role exceedingly well.

Jayasuriya and Atapattu added 101 and, then, Jayasuriya and Sangakkara put on 70 (again in quick time) for the second-wicket. The wickets to fall were those of Atapattu, the captain and Mahela Jayawardene as Lanka ended the day 77 ahead (264 for three) with many wickets intact.

Sourav had his reasons for opening with Srinath and Prasad, but one felt Zaheer Khan should have shared the new ball with our most experienced quick. The one stand-out bowler was Harbhajan Singh, whose first spell was a marathon one of 26 overs.

Surprisingly (given that a low total was being defended), the ground fielding was often tardy. Worse, Rahul Dravid dropped Sangakkara (off Harbhajan) when on eight. By stumps, Sangakkara had moved to 54.

Stumps was again delayed, both on account of the slow over rate and a 41-minute stoppage, owing to rain, after tea.

   

 
 
XU JUN A DRAW AWAY FROM TITLE 
 
 
BY BIPIN SHENOY
 
Calcutta, Aug. 16: 
Top seed Xu Jun of China and Saidali Iuldachev of Uzbekistan ensured berths in the world chess championship after the penultimate round of the Asian men’s chess championship at Gorky Sadan today.

Xu booked his seat with a quick draw against compatriot Yu Shaoteng, while Iuldachev prevailed over Shukrat Safin. Xu now leads with eight points and needs a draw against Alexie Barsov of Uzbekistan tomorrow to take the title. Iuldachev has 7.5 points.

Surya Sekhar Ganguly, Iran’s Ehsan Ghaem Maghami and Barsov share the third spot with seven points and are almost certain to qualify. The top ten from this meet will make the cut. Maghami, the 19-year-old, became the first Iranian to become a GM when he drew against Tahir Vakhidov yesterday. Today, he beat Handszar Odeev. Yesterday, five GM norms and as many IM norms were secured. P. Harikrishna and Surya Sekhar achieved GM norms, while Sriram Jha got his final IM norm to become India’s 30th IM. This was Surya’s maiden GM norm.

Harikrishna, who drew against Zang Penxiang of China today, will have to beat Maghami tomorrow to secure the GM title. If Harikrishna wins, he will become the youngest Indian to get the GM title at 15 years of age. If he doesn’t win, Harikrishna will have to start afresh and collect another nine-round norm. Yesterday, he held the top seed.

GM Dibyendu Barua also came back into contention by beating GM Murtas Kazhzaleyev of Kazakhstan who opted for the Pirc Defence. Other Indian GMs went out of reckoning though K. Sasikiran has already qualified for the world meet.

RESULTS (10th round): Yu Shaoteng (6.5) drew Xu Jun (8); Shukhrat Safin (6) lost to Saidali Iuldachev (7.5); S.S. Ganguly (7) bt Anh Dung Nguyen (6); P. Harikrishna (6.5) drew Zhang Pengxiang (6.5); E. Maghami (7) bt Odeev Handszar (6); Alexei Barsov (7) bt Tahir Vakhidov (6); Peng Xiaomin (5.5) lost to Petr Kostenko (6.5); Dibyendu Barua (6.5) bt Murtas Kazhzaleyev (5.5); Marat Dzhumaev (6.5) bt We Wenjin (5.5); Wang Zili (6) drew Sergey Zagrebelny (6).

OTHER INDIANS: Eugene Torre (6) bt P. Thipsay (5); Abdulla Al-Rakib (6) bt Abhijit Kunte (4.5); K. Sasikiran (5.5) bt Mark Paragua (4.5); B. Villamayor (5) drew D.V. Prasad (5); Rogelio Antonio Jr (5.5) bt P. Konguvel (4.5); Ziaur Rahman (5) bt Sriram Jha (4); Vladimir Egin (5) bt Lanka Ravi (4); Arash Roghani (3.5) lost to Sandipan Chanda (4.5); Ronald Dableo (4) drew N.K. Mishra (4).

   

 
 
PRAKASH NETS 3 OUT OF BAGAN’S 5 
 
 
BY A STAFF REPORTER
 
Calcutta, Aug. 16: 
Mohun Bagan maintained their fine winning streak in the Super Division today when they thrashed a lowly BNR 5-0 at home. R.C. Prakash scored three, but missed a hattrick.

It was a one-sided affair, with the visitors failing to get any grip on a turf none-to secure off a strong shower. Except for a couple of good saves by goalkeeper Sumit Chowdhury, there was little to talk about for BNR.

The first goal came in the fifth minute when, off a Rennedy Singh pass, Abdulateef Seriki centred to the goalmouth for Prakash to boot home. Immediately after, Lakshman Singh could have made it 1-1, but his powerful shot was saved well by Bivash Ghosh.

Thirty minutes later James Singh moved into the rival defence zone — the little challenge that was offered proving futile — and chipped to the goalmouth. Defender Amouri Da’Silva, who has otherwise had a mediocre outing so far, had overlapped to push initiatives and found himself with the target in front. He shot in the second goal easily.

The rain had done no good to the play, but the BNR defence had crumbled. Four minutes after changeover Jose Ramirez Barreto passed to James who shot home with ease. In the 67th minute a Dulal Biswas centre to the goalmouth was nodded in by Prakash. Prakash rounded off his tally in the last minute.

TEAMS

MOHUN BAGAN: Bivash Ghosh, Rishi Kapoor, Hussein Mustafi, Amouri Da’Silva, Dulal Biswas, Renedy Singh, Basudeb Mondal, James Singh, Abdulateef Seriki (Goutam Ghosh, 66), RC Prakash, Jose Ramirez Barreto (Ajoy Singh, 55).

BNR: Sumit Chowdhury, Partha Saha, Robin Chowdhury, Manoj Das, Jayanta Ghosh (Gopal Ghora, 46), Lakshman Singh, Partha Mitra (Tulsi Rao, 46), Moin-ul Haq, Atanu Dey, Balai Mondal, Kamal Ghosh.

Referee: Kashinath Sen

Sporting Club to face EB

Peter Pereira’s golden goal in the second minute of extra time to help Sporting Club of Goa beat Indian Bank 1-0 in a first-round match of the Federation Cup in Chennai today, PTI reports.

Sporting Club will next meet East Bengal.

   

 
 
‘MEET ON WITHOUT INDIA’ 
 
 
BY A STAFF REPORTER
 
Calcutta, Aug 16: 
Asian Cricket Council (ACC) chairman Jagmohan Dalmiya today confirmed what Pakistan chief Tauqir Zia has been saying: the Asian Test Championship in September will have to go on, whether India does participate or not. The Indian government is not in favour of an Indian team playing in Pakistan.

“The tournament will lose a great deal of glamour if India do not play,” said Dalmiya, “but then reorganisations will have to made. The BCCI is doing its best to get the permission granted.” He reiterated the Council “will wait till August 23-24 for the go ahead.”

While the playing conditions of the meet were finalised by the technical committee of the ACC, it was also agreed upon by the development committee and screening committee that Roger Binny will be the development officer for Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Brunei. Pakistan’s Muhammad Iqbal Sikander (the UAE, Oman, Qatar and Kuwait) and Sri Lankan Rumesh Ratnayake (Nepal, Maldives, Hong Kong and Bhutan) were also appointed development officers. They take up responsibility from the first week of September, and 18 coaching camps have been planned till March 2002.

The technical committee meeting was attended by Sunil Gavaskar (chairman), Zaheer Abbas (Pakistan), Asantha de Mel (Sri Lanka) and Gazi Ashraf Hossain ‘Lipu’ and Syed Ashraful Haque (Bangladesh). Dalmiya and ACC secretary Zakir Hussain Syed also attended.

The ‘standard playing conditions’, as adopted today, will come into effect from September 1.

To “promote attractive cricket” a novel points system was also devised in which an innings victory will fetch 16 points against 12 for just an outright win.

To push the runs and the wickets, ‘bonus points’ have also been devised. If over 400 runs are scored in the first 100 overs, four such points will be available, scaled down by a point each in 350-399, 300-349 and 250-29 categories. Similar are the points incentive for wickets taken in the first 10 overs, with categories being 10 wickets (4 points), 8-9 (3), 6-7 (2) and 4-5 (1).

The ACC has also tied up with the New Zealand Sports Turf Institute to assist the non-Test playing countries with the preparation of grounds and pitches. In another development Olympian Dr Vece Paes was appointed the Council’s sports medicine and physical training consultant. This apart there will be coaches’ and trainers’ workshops, and clinics, to, for umpires and curators of non-Test-playing countries.

   

 
 
ANOTHER FEATHER IN BULA’S CAP 
 
 
BY A STAFF REPORTER
 
Calcutta, Aug. 16: 
Bula Chowdhury is back after her fine display in the 28km Swiss Tyrrhenian Sea swimming she completed on August 10. It was adjudged as the fastest swim for any Asian woman over that stretch.

“I’m feeling good over 20-30 km distances around the world, and experts there have told me so,” said Bula. “I feel I am getting better. I now plan to cross a New Zealand stretch in December-January.”

Bula, who finished the Tyrrhenian Sea stretch in 7 hours and 32 minutes, said the conditions were “ideal” and that the average temperature of 28-30 degrees Celsius was good, compared to any Channel swim. Bula is a double English Channel winner.

1115 donate blood

There was a drop in number of blood donors on Football Lovers’ Day, organised by the Association of Voluntary Blood Donors, West Bengal and the IFA today. This year the donors numbered 1115, compared to last year’s 1183. The number swells if one considers the districts — Bishnupur 305, Berhampore 22, Siliguri 54, Hooghly 127 and Kulti 72.    

 
 
MILKHA NO TO ARJUNA 
 
 
FROM GAJINDER SINGH
 
Chandigarh, Aug. 16: 
‘Flying Sikh’ Milkha Singh today said he had written to sports minister Uma Bharti declining the Arjuna Award for a lifetime contribution as his achievements had been clubbed with sportspersons who had a “long way to go before coming anywhere near what he has achieved on the racing track”.

In the letter, Singh said he would have appreciated it “if a new-named higher award had been instituted, keeping in view my achievements.”

He blamed sports officials and even Bharti for lowering the prestige of the Arjuna Awards by giving them to undeserving persons.

“I have taken the decision after speaking to the sports minister and people who hold me in high esteem. The Arjuna Awards are being doled out to people who do not deserve them. The PM’s office and even ministers have started recommendingnames.”

Singh won four gold medals at the Asian Games, a gold in the 1958 Commonwealth Games, received the Helms World Trophy in 1959 from the US for being the world’s best 400m runner and broke the Olympic record in Rome in 1960. “Is there anyone else in the country who has achieved what I have done? I ran 80 races all over the world winning 77 of them.”

   

 
 
CALCUTTA RACES/ BALLET MASTER SURPRISES 
 
 
BY STAR RACER
 
Calcutta, Aug. 16: 
The Daniel David-trained Ballet Master posted an upset victory in the 1,400m Independence Cup today. Paul Kujur partnered the four-year-old colt.

RESULTS

1. Kipling Handicap 1,100m: (3-5-4) Alegria (C. Alford) 1; Floral Path (Islam) 2; Pneumatic Power (Yasin) 3. Won by: 5-1/4; 1/2; (1-12.2). Tote: Win Rs 14; Place: 10; 28; Quinella: 41; Tanala: 182. Fav: Alegria (3). Winner trained by Vijay S.
2. Esmon Handicap 1,400m: (6-2-1) Rheinheart (Shanker) 1; Double Bull (Connorton) 2; Flying Scot (F. Khan) 3. Won by: 2-1/2; 3/4; (1-30.1). Tote: Win Rs 48; Place: 16; 17; 18; Quinella: 61; Tanala: 387. Fav: Double Bull (2). Winner trained by Bath.
3. La Gitana Cup 1,800: (2-3-4) Lockers Park (Islam) 1; No Regrets (Gowli) 2; Aldebro (C. Alford) 3. Won by: Dist; 9-1/4; (1-59.1). Tote: Win Rs 22; Place: 11; 24; Quinella: 48; Tanala: 74. Fav: Lockers Park (2). Winner trained by Bharath S.
4. Gamble For Love Cup 1,200m: (1-2-3) Alyssum (Amil) 1; Anolini (C. Alford) 2; Clarice Cliff (Rabani) 3. Won by: Nk; Nk; (1-17.2). Tote: Win Rs 80; Place: 28; 23; Quinella: 116; Tanala: 388. Fav: Clarice Cliff (3). Winner trained by Vijay S.
5. Independence Cup 1,400m: (8-10-4) Ballet Master (Kujur) 1; Solo Act (Amil) 2; Grand Lodge (Upadhya) 3. Won by: 2; 1-1/2; (1-30.8). Tote: Win Rs 55; Place: 19; 46; 31; Quinella: 638; Tanala: 8,916. Fav: Actress (2). Winner trained by Daniel D.
6. Mount Everest Handicap 1,200m: (1-3-2) Alcalde (C. Alford) 1; Regency Times (Connorton) 2; Alamito (Rabani) 3. Won by: Nk; 5-1/4; 4; (1-20.6). Tote: Win Rs 22; Place: 18; 18; Quinella: 41; Tanala: 98. Fav: Alcalde (1). Winner trained by Bharath S.
Jackpot: Rs 7,780; (C) Rs 1,812.
Treble: (i) Rs 116; (ii) Rs 663.
   

 
 
MYSORE RACES/ MYSORE TIPS 
 
 
FROM WILLIAM TELL
 
Mysore, Aug. 16: 
Resist The Force may win the Safi Darashah Memorial Gold Cup here tomorrow.

SELECTIONS

1 pm: Silver Falcon 1. Rusticana 2. Comrade In Arms 3.
1.30 pm: Kool Kruiser 1. Catch Word 2. Dad’s Prize 3.
2 pm: Mum’s The Word 1. Enthr-onement 2. Artic Minstrel 3.
2.30 pm: Kilkemny 1. Medwin 2. Radical 3.
3 pm: Secret Halo 1. Al Habib 2. Grisogono 3.
3.30 pm: Supreme Heights 1. Marcus Aurelius 2. Prowl 3
4 pm: Resist The Force 1. Alylady 2. Fairy Winter 3.
4.30 pm: Atomic Fusion 1. Argyle Gold 2. Poise 3.
5 pm: Barassie 1. Royal Castle 2. Turn My Luck 3.
5.30 pm: Aide de Memoire 1. Rare Jewel 2. Sacristia 3.
Day’s Best: Resist The Force
Double: Secret Halo & Atomic Fusion.

Today’s Mysore winners

1st race: Just Do It
2nd race: Star Pride
3rd race: Royal Satsuma
4th race: Pleasantville
5th race: Earl Grey
6th race: Kingston Heath
7th race: Black Ocean
8th race: Brora.
Jackpot: Rs 27,978; (C) Rs 696.
Mini jackpot: Rs 2,921.
Treble: (i) Rs 1,590; (ii) Rs 2,405.

Wednesdays’ Pune Results

(With inter-state dividends)
1st race: Pink Floyd 1; Adam’s Delight 2; Thrilling Lights 3. (W) Rs 42; (P) 15; 16; 21; (Q) 75; (T) 842.
2nd race: Torres 1; Dominant Force 2; Knighted 3. (W) Rs 29; (P) 19; 26; (Q) 99; (T) 220.
3rd race: Touch Wood 1; Wild Wind 2; Celtic Son 3. (W) Rs 18; (P) 12; 17; 21;(Q) 42; (T) 201.
4th race: Tonnerre 1; Blue Blood 2; Lawyer’s Love 3. (W) Rs 45; (P) 17; 17; 66; (Q) 67; (T) 2,809.
5th race: Aspiring Star 1; Maratha Princess 2; Texas King 3. (W) Rs 18; (P) 13; 17; 35; (Q) 41; (T) 336.
6th race: Tobler 1; Rambus 2; Angara 3. (W) Rs 45; (P) 14; 12; 23; (Q) 28; (T) 275.
7th race: Grey Area 1; Weathering 2; Prabhuti 3. (W) Rs 98; (P) 35; 99; 54;(Q) 2,774;(T) 97,270 (C.o).
8th race: Double Barrel 1; Numero Uno 2; Clever Talk 3. (1-14.3). (W) Rs 559; (P) 100; 25; 34; (Q) 1,514; (T) 76,463.
Jackpot: Rs 1,58,270 (Carried over); ( C) Rs 904.
Treble: (I) Rs 128; (ii) Rs 79,590 (Carried over).
   
 

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