Laxman belligerence keeps Indians ticking
Wristy Laxman reminds Eden of Azhar
We’re prepared to win, 400 or 40 runs: Buchanan
Fingers remain crossed in hope
‘The right move’
India may not host 2002 edition
Hard-fought victory for EB
Tolly looking for a draw
Calcutta Races/ Andreyev may win ‘Leger’
Calcutta Races/ Accrete, Crucible impress

Calcutta, March 13: 
Australia 445
India 171 & 254/4

In the build-up to this series, Steve Waugh never quite forgot to bracket (“brilliant”) V.V.S. Laxman with the Sachin Tendulkars.

At the Eden today, on Day III of the second Test, the wristy Laxman confirmed the Australian captain’s worst fears: That he has the potential to upset the most delicately arranged applecart.

Playing his 21st Test, Laxman completed his fifty in the morning and, then, when India followed-on 274 in arrears, posted an unbeaten century — his second, both against Australia.

Also, the first by an Indian in this three-Test Pepsi series.

As Laxman had resumed at the overnight 26, he missed becoming the first batsman ever to score both a fifty and hundred on any one day of a Test.

But even if Laxman, who never speaks out of turn and has no airs about him, didn’t author history, his century (specially) will rank among the finest in the counter-attack role.

A class act, really.

The first fifty came in 128 minutes, off 95 balls with eight boundaries; the next fifty took only 92 minutes and 71 balls. Nine boundaries were struck in this period as Laxman neither cared for reputation nor form.

And, so, top guns Glenn McGrath and Shane Warne weren’t spared the Laxman-treatment as the 26-year-old drove, flicked, glanced and pulled with the regal touch that marked the Nawabs’ durbars in Hyderabad.

Pretty unusually for McGrath and Warne, both had two spells each, in the second innings, when they went wicketless.

Laxman’s stunning effort came after being promoted to No. 3 (with Rahul Dravid pushed to No. 6) at coach John Wright’s behest. “There are times some things need to be done differently,” Wright told The Telegraph, by way of explanation.

No explanation is required as the move (perfectly logical in the circumstances) clicked, giving a fresh dimension to the Test which was heading one way: Another (series-wrapping) victory for Australia.

Just this one day, clearly, will stand out as an excellent advertisement for Test cricket.

Four down and still in arrears by 20, the pressure remains on India. But, for the first time in quite a while, Steve’s men were rattled (by Laxman’s defiance), an absolute giveaway being the numerous on-field ‘conferences’ between bowlers and senior pros.

That the Australians, accustomed to operating without hiccups, were made to pause and think is in the present context an achievement.

For India to offer even a semblance of a challenge, somebody had to convey that message. In Laxman, India found the perfect medium. It couldn’t have been music for the Australians’ ears, though.

Yet, each one of them made it a point to congratulate Laxman (either just after his century or at the delayed stumps). If not anything else, this gesture helped relegate to the background captain Sourav Ganguly’s spat with McGrath.

“Laxman is such a beautiful batsman and, while he did do the job today, he must continue the good work. We’ve got to bat around four (more) sessions,” remarked Wright.

Sourav, who would have regained much confidence during his own innings of 48 but was devastated at having exited to an absolute beauty (from McGrath), didn’t offer a detailed comment.

“We’ve got a long way to go... Perhaps, I should only air my thoughts at stumps tomorrow..”

Significantly Laxman, in whom shades of Mohammed Azharuddin can be seen, joined the 1,000-club during the second innings — the 359th cricketer overall and 45th Indian.

At stumps, keeping Laxman company was Dravid and on them is the burden of, first, averting an innings defeat and, then, in effect beginning from scratch.

[India’s first innings ended 55 minutes into play, with Laxman being last out. Venkatapathi Raju, the other overnighter, had departed pretty early but Venkatesh Prasad withstood the heat for over 40 minutes and featured in the innings’ highest partnership — 42.]

Actually, despite the pressure, the Indian second innings got off to its best start of the series. Thanks largely to Sadagopan Ramesh, who (typically) took all the chances he could.

Ramesh, however, had to perish sooner rather than later, only he became a Warne victim not that of a quick.

Next out was Shiv Sundar Das. Pushed on the backfoot by Jason Gillespie, he backtracked to such an extent that the back leg knocked against the base of the stumps. Off came one bail and a promising innings, therefore, had a tragic end.

Sachin, definitely under pressure, didn’t last long but that still didn’t justify the hurling of a water pouch by a miscreant (quickly nabbed by the cops) to the right of the Club House.

However, Sachin will himself acknowledge he ought not to have been tempted by that widish delivery from Gillespie, who was generally into overdrive.

Sachin’s first century, at the Eden, has to wait.

His departure brought Sourav and Laxman together and while the captain did scratch around at times, he did launch into his trademark off drives. For the first time this series, Sourav looked good.

As it turned out, though, he fell far short of registering a captain’s knock.

Indeed, when the going isn’t good, only the best is directed at you. And, McGrath bowled a winner: It swung late and Sourav, who was committed, found the edge being taken by Adam Gilchrist.

Sourav and Laxman added 117 for the fourth-wicket, with the Hyderabadi pretty much the senior partner. The partnership is India’s best of the series.

Immediately after stumps, Dravid headed for the software-corner, outside the dressing room, to watch both his own clips as well as that of the bowlers.

Dravid’s commitment comes through on all occasions, it’s just that he isn’t getting runs in what is a big series. More to the point, he is allowing himself to be dictated.

The clips, hopefully, would have given Dravid newer ideas. As it is, the second new ball will soon be due.


Calcutta, March 13: 
If one of the reasons why Mohammed Azharuddin is “preparing” for a comeback is that some fans are missing his wristy elegance, he needn’t worry too much.

All that they now have to do is root for Vangipurappu Venkata Sai Laxman, the 26-year-old fellow-Hyderabadi.

There were, after all, many occasions here today, on an incredible Day III of the second Test, when the around 55,000 turnout found the Azhar replica in Laxman.

“Well, coming from Hyderabad, Azhar’s influence has certainly been there. But, only where a couple of shots are concerned. It’s a fact of course that, over the years, I often interacted with Azhar,” Laxman told The Telegraph.

Specifically, an on-drive off Michael Kasprowicz and a glance off Glenn McGrath were typical Azhar. Though Laxman may not exactly have an Azhar-like record at the Eden, he has still posted three fifties and a century in seven innings.

Laxman is one of the few Indian cricketers to unwind with books and generally keeps to himself, but is still regarded a “terrific team man.” Predictably, then, he dedicated his effort to “the team.”

But his first thoughts, at the end of a terrific day, went to his parents (V. Shantaram and V. Satyabhama, both of whom are doctors) and mentor-uncle Baba Krishna Mohan.

Resuming his first innings at 26, Laxman reached 59 before being dismissed and, then, in the second essay, lashed an unbeaten 109 to more than just eliminate the possibility of India being humiliated.

In fact, as Laxman himself put it, “the first hour tomorrow” will determine just where this Test is headed. The second new ball, for one, will soon be due.

Later, fielding questions from the Media in general, Laxman remarked he was “very comfortable” batting at No. 3. He added: “I consider that a lucky position and was game when asked (at the end of the first innings) whether I would bat there.”

[Though manager Chetan Chauhan announced the “team management” (collectively) made the offer, it is understood the move was initiated by coach John Wright.]

Laxman, for his part, didn’t wish to compare his century today with the dazzling 167 in Sydney, 14 months ago. “Look, that will always be special for two reasons: Scoring a century in Australia was a dream come true and, secondly, it remains my first...”

That effort, though, proved futile as India lost in under three days. Here, Laxman has helped India stay afloat in the three-Test series.

“The idea, in the morning, was to try and avoid the follow-on. Even though we didn’t, that we stretched the innings till almost an hour, gave us confidence for the second essay. I must compliment Venks (Venkatesh Prasad) for batting almost three quarters of an hour,” Laxman said.

Laxman felt the wicket had become much slower and the turn was now appreciable. Smiling, he added: “Should we manage a lead of 200-225, the Australians will find it tough batting last...”

Having played much of his early cricket on matting, Laxman doesn’t struggle with bounce, which explains the elan with which he pulls and hooks.

Laxman himself observed: “Yes, you could say I’ve had a good foundation... The matting surface experience has helped.” Also, the guidance of “all coaches” at the St John’s Cricket Foundation and the late M.L. Jaisimha.

Significantly, in his only other appearance at the Eden against Australia, exactly three years ago, Laxman authored the innings of that Test: 95, before falling to Gavin Robertson.

Was he, even slightly, hit by nerves on reaching the 90s here again? The answer came quicker than any of his 25 boundaries during the day: “Not at all.”

Laxman has the guts (we saw that in Cape Town on the 1996-97 South Africa tour). He has breathtaking strokes, too. And, most important, if he has a priority it’s that the team always comes first.

Sure, we could do with more Laxmans.


Calcutta, March 13: 
John Buchanan was the last to leave the Eden. The Australian coach stayed back with Glenn McGrath, Jason Gillespie and few others as dusk settled on the green, working out some last-minute strategies.

Vangipurappu Venkata Sai Laxman had left the visitors clueless for most of the third day, forcing Buchanan to go back to the drawing board after stumps. His 59 and unbeaten 109 has also helped the hosts restore a bulk of the confidence that seemed to have deserted them in the current series.

The innings also left Buchanan effusive in his praise of the Hyderabad batsman. “Laxman’s innings was outstanding. He had batted well in Sydney in the last Test when the Indians were touring Down Under. He seemed to have replayed that innings today,” Buchanan told The Telegraph this evening.

“It has been a good batting wicket once the batsman gets set. Once he has adjusted to the pace, putting a big score is not difficult. Laxman proved just that. It has also happened a few times previously during the course of the game,” he explained.

“Laxman was the mainstay of the Indian batting. It was around him that a few useful partnerships developed. He tackled everything on offer, including the new ball, with resilience. I believe, he deserved what he got,” the Aussie coach said.

However, he does not think his bowlers gave much leeway to the batsman. “The bowlers stuck to their task and the fielding has also been pretty good. It’s just that Laxman was brilliant,” Buchanan admitted.

The visitors are not willing to disturb their concentration with any negative thoughts. So what will be his tactics tomorrow?

“It’s hard to predict. From the Indian point of view they will obviously be hoping Laxman and (Rahul) Dravid carry on the run-making spree and thereafter establish a few more good partnerships. Our main aim will be to take a couple of early wickets to pile on the pressure.”

What sort of a target does he think will be challenging on this wicket? The seasoned pro did not pause for a minute, reflecting the never-say-die Aussie attitude that has been the secret of their stupendous success over the years.

“I’m not looking at it that way. We’re prepared to win whether it be 400 or 40,” he remarked.

However, he said: “Batting on the last two days will be difficult than it has been on the first three. The wicket is already showing signs of some turn, though, slowly.”

That does not seem to have worried him. He has already chalked out a plan of action for his batsmen to ensure a series-winning 2-0 lead. “It doesn’t necessarily mean that the wicket is a minefield. The main task will be to tackle the new ball with care and then negotiate the spin of Harbhajan (Singh) and (Venkatpathi) Raju,” he said.

The Aussies are already oozing confidence in their gameplan and it will take a mamoth effort for the home team to upset their formula.


Calcutta, March 13: 
Can India save the second Test? Hope may have reared its head on the crest of the second innings resurgence at the Eden, but most former Test stars feel such a possibility still lies in the realms of the miracle.

The encouraging thought for Sourav Ganguly and his men is no one has yet described their task as ‘Mission Impossible’. Some have suggested there is a chance to bring the Aussies under some pressure.

“Anything is possible in cricket,” reminded Maninder Singh. “If Laxman can keep going the way he has today, and the others rally around him, we can well have a match on our hands.”

It’s a view shared by Erapalli Prasanna. “If the Aussies can be set a target of 150 or more, they can be put under pressure on the fifth day,” the former off-spinning great told The Telegraph over phone from Bangalore.

Prasanna feels the key to how the match goes from here will depend greatly on the first one-hour tomorrow. “The new ball is due in another five overs, and the pair at the crease (Laxman and Dravid) will have to see it off. They will have to do most of the work, as I don’t see the rest last too long if the partnership is broken quickly.”

Like most others, Prasanna has little faith in the Indian tail.

“It starts from Harbhajan, and is very long,” reminds Sanjay Manjrekar. “I wonder if he gets to bat as high as No. 8 for his state side,” says Arun Lal. Both Manjrekar and Lal feel saving the match would be “nothing short of a miracle”, though the former sounded more hopeful. “Well, Laxman will have to play a big big innings with Dravid in support,” he added.

Lal points at the new ball that’s round the corner, and remind: “We lost it in the first innings. First, by allowing the Aussies to get away to that total and then batting horribly. If Sourav was still around, I’d say we had a chance.”

While both Maninder and Prasanna strike the more optimistic note, the left-arm spinner seems to have more faith in the Indian tail.

“Zaheer and Harbhajan are capable of decent batting. What’ll matter is whether the Indians are willing to stay and fight. It is still a good batting strip, and the battle is really in the mind from here.”


Calcutta, March 13: 
V.V.S. Laxman’s promotion in the batting order is in keeping with the demands of the modern game, feels Sanjay Manjrekar.

The former middle-order batsman, more puritan than pugnacious in his playing days, feels teams these days need a No. 3 capable of staring the rival in the eye.

“The modern game needs a No. 3 who can play a dominant role,” the former India batsman told The Telegraph.

That is why he lauded the move to have Laxman at No. 3 ahead of Rahul Dravid who doesn’t always keep the scorer busy despite being sound in defence.

“Rahul has always been a defensive player, the grafting type, but the need of the age is someone who can temper aggression with those qualities,” he opined.

Praising Laxman for sticking to his decision of not returning to the opener’s slot, Manjrekar said India needed someone like him in the middle-order.

“After Sachin Tendulkar, Laxman is the one Indian batsman who looks relaxed and assured out there. So he had to be brought up from No. 6.”

On the observation that Laxman’s job at No. 3 may still be like that of an opener, given the recent record of Indian openers, Manjrekar chose to differ.

“Opening is a specialist’s job. A middle-order slot will suit him better as he will be more comfortable at any number barring the top two.”

Commenting on Tendulkar’s second-innings dismissal at the Eden today, Manjrekar did not blame the master for attempting to drive away from the body.

“He was trying to be positive, something that was expected of him. Also, (Jason) Gillespie had struck a very good rhythm at that time,” he said.


Calcutta, March 13: 
India may not host the ICC KnockOut tournament next year. According to BCCI secretary Jaywant Lele, holding the biennial event in India is difficult on two accounts.

The BCCI secretary said that since the event is scheduled to be held in September, 2002, the weather can be a problem as several parts of the country will be under the spell of monsoon.

There are financial inhibitions as well. “From such a tournament, the BCCI can only earn through gate receipts. The rest, from sponsorship etc, goes to the ICC. So we won’t be gaining much,” said Lele.

He said the BCCI has sent a letter to the government Friday, seeking clarification on whether the team can take part in a tri-series in Sharjah next month. A reply is awaited.


Calcutta, March 13: 
East Bengal 2
Churchill 1

East Bengal stayed atop the National League table as they recorded a hard-fought 2-1 win over Churchill Brothers at the Salt Lake Stadium today.

East Bengal now have 30 points from 13 outings and are followed by FC Kochin with 29 points from the same number of matches.

The city giants went into the lead in the 6th minute with Dipankar Roy, the dimunitive midfielder, scoring. They consolidated the lead in the 31st with the veteran Carlton Chapman obliging this time.

Churchill, easily the better side in the second half, got one back in the 75th when Uzbekistan recruit Igor Shkvirin shot past goalkeeper Sangram Mukherjee.

Coming from a draw in their last match against their nearest rivals, FC Kochin, East Bengal started very strongly in the first half. They produced some attractive football, creating several inroads into the opposition’s defence. They missed most of the chances, and converted two.

The first goal resulted from a move which started on the left with Ghanaian Isiaka Awoyemi, who dodged two defenders, putting them into the wrong foot. Isiaka passed the ball into the path of an overlapping Dipankar, who came charging in. Dipankar, with a curling left-footed inswinger from 22 yards, smartly put the ball beyond Churchill’s Ghanaian goalkeeper Edward Ansah.

Then followed a series of attacks from East Bengal, all ending on the wrong side of goal, though. Dipankar, however, was in his elements today, putting up a spirited display with deft touches and skilful turns.

Another exquisite move resulted in the second goal. Ratan Singh’s forward pass to Dipankar on the left was totally misread by the Churchill defence as they went for the off-side trap. Dipankar managed to elude that, sent a low cross into the box, which beat Dipendu Biswas, but fell into Carlton Chapman’s way, who came charging down the middle. Chapman wasted no time and shot into the goal with a stinging left-footer.

In the second half, East Bengal were more on the defensive. Churchill introduced Somatai Shaiza after the break, in place of Edson de Bastro, and the attacking abilities of the Goan side started to surface.

In the 30th minute, M. Rajesh sent a cross into the box from the right, Shaiza collected it and set it up for Igor, who shot it in with a right footer before Sangram had the time to react — probably the only instance where the East Bengal goalkeeper failed on the day.

In the next few minutes, Churchill set up a blitz of attacks, and the fact that they couldn’t convert any was their opponent’s good fortune. In the dying minutes, Churchill won a corner. Taken by Noel Wilson, the ball fell to Igor who shot at the goal but a combined effort from Sur Kumar and Chandan Das just about prevented a draw. The latter’s contribution was, however, controversial as Chandan used his hand to clear the ball before Sur Kumar made the goalline save in the 90th minute.

Suley Musah’s absence was felt very visibly by the East Bengal midfield and due to an injury on his right knee, Jackson Egygpong had to be substituted early into the second half. The Churchill thinktank were quick in their attempt to take advantage of that. The big Osumanu Husseini immediately left his position at the defence and moved upfront, beating most East Bengal defenders to the aerial ball.


EAST BENGAL: Sangram Mukherjee; Sur Kumar Singh, Jackson Egygpong (Anit Ghosh, 52nd), Dipak Mondal, Ratan Singh; Carlton Chapman (Sheikh Sanjib, 68th), Isiaka Awoyemi, Chandan Das, Dipankar Roy; Dipendu Biswas (Falguni Dutta, 85th), Omolaja Olalekan.

CHURCHILL BROTHERS: Edward Ansah; Denzil Ferrao, Osumanu Husseini, Mahesh Gawli, Mir Farooq Hyder, Roque Baretto (M. Rajesh, 64th), Noel Wilson, Jose Bolaso, Edson de Bastro (Somatai Shaiza, 46th), Francis Silveira, Igor Shkvirin.

Referee: S. Suresh.


Calcutta, March 13: 
Six missing men have pushed Tollygunge Agragami into a defensive frame of mind as they brace themselves for tomorrow’s National League showdown with Salgaocar.

“We’ll be happy to come away with a point,” a top club official said this evening. “Three would be a big bonus.”

Stopper-back Partha Sarathi Dey and striker Bhabani Mohanty are in Hyderabad to turn out for their employers, right-back Reazul Mustafa and medio Aboyemi Felix are booked out with double yellow cards while injuries to goalkeeper Hemanta Dora and Nepoleon Singh will keep them out.

While Tollygunge, on 10 points from 12 matches, have been forced to lower their sights for the moment, their opponents will be “going all out” for a win.

“We beat them 2-0 in the home match (in Goa), and we want to beat them again tomorrow,” Marcus Pacheko said. The Salgaocar coach says the League campaign “has gone according to plan” and they were targetting a top-three finish from here. They have 19 points from 12 matches.

Salgaocar have their own little problems, though.

First goalkeeper Abubacher is out with an ankle injury and Juje Siddi will have to fill in. They will have to also contend with a pitch (at the Rabindra Sarobar Stadium) that is much smaller than the ones they are used to playing on in Goa.

In internationals Bruno Coutinho and Alvito D’Cunha, Salgaocar have very potent strikers and Tollygunge will have to ensure that, even in their safety-first approach, they manage to keep the ball away from their defensive third as far as possible.

Upfront, Tollygunge strikers Abdulateef Seriki and Emeka Achilefu will have to contend with a fairly sturdy defence where Roberto Fernandes and Franky Barreto will occupy the stopper-back positions. Roberto may just be a trifle shaky, having played only a few matches after a long lay-off due to a knee operation.

Jules Alberto is the key man in midfield. For Tollygunge, Sasthi Duley has had a very good run so far. Coach Amal Dutta will be hoping the form holds. The diminutive medio is capable of opening up opposing defences with lovely runs and ball skills.

In other matches tomorrow, JCT will take on Vasco in Ludhiana while ITI clash with Mahindra in Bangalore.


Calcutta, March 13: 
With Aslam Kader to guide, Andreyev may be seen at an advantage, tomorrow, in the longest classic of the season, the 2,800m Calcutta St. Leger. The Padmanabhan-trained four-year-old may, however, find a strong challenger in Alvarada who is still recovering from the stab wound inflicted on the Derby-eve.

Alyssum is fancied to win the sporting event, the Governor’s Cup.

1st Race 1.40 pm.

Play On Handicap 1,200m (Cl V —Rated 00-28) — Indian jockeys only
1 0000 Googy Gangster [Rodrigues] G. Upadhya 60.5 5
2 - 000 Bhuthnath [Rodrigues] P. Kumar 60.0 6
3 0000 Stately Honour [Mujeeb] Gajender S. 60.0 1
4 3402 Tsaynen Blue [Javed] R. Gowli 58.0 3
5 0040 Floral Path [Bath] G. Singh 57.0 2
W ---- Heaven’s Blessing [Bath] (Withdrawn) 56.5 --
7 3333 Go Wtih The Wind [R. Alford] Rutherford A. 55.0 7
8 4044 Go India Go [Jaiswal] Som S. 49.5 8
9 - 443 Three Good [Bharath] S. Rabani 47.5 4
1. Tsaynen Blue (4) 2. Three Ggood (9) 3. Stately Honour (3)

2nd Race 2.20 pm.

Long Tom Handicap 2,000m (Cl IV; Cl V, eligible Rt. 00-50)— Indian jockeys only
1 4120 Arco Europa [Vijay] A. P. Singh 60.0 3
2 0004 Aragrove [Daniel] Saran S. 57.5 1
3 4210 American [Karki] E. Smith 57.0 4
4 - - 24 Alembic [Karki] C. Alford 55.5 6
5 0021 Blessed Spirit [Daniel] A. Imran K. 52.5 9
6 4221 Crest Star [Goenka] S. Nasruddin 52.0 5
7 0002 Flying Scot [Javed] R. Gowli 52.0 7
8 0002 Royal Ruler [R. Alford] K. P. Appu 52.0 8
9 3004 Supreme Desire [Rodrigues] G. Upadhya 52.0 2
10 0210 Consul’s Secret [Jaiswal] M. Reuben 51.5 11
11 0043 Scavenger’s Son [Daniel] S. Tamang 50.5 10
1. Consul’s Secret (10) 2. Alembic (4) 3. Royal Ruler (8)

3rd Race 2.55 pm.

Madras Race Club Cup 1,200m (Cl II — Rt. 66-94)
1 4004 No Surrender [Javed] M. Reuben 60.0 5
2 3430 Quickdraw Mcgraw [Karki] Amjad K. 58.0 6
3 1010 Alsheim [Vijay] C. Alford 57.5 10
4 4432 Best In Show [Daniel] B. Gurang 57.0 13
5 2302 Mameena [Stephens] K. P. Appu 55.5 11
6 - 110 Auctioneer [Vijay] Md. Islam 54.5 2
7 0020 Princelene [Asfand] R. Gowli 54.0 9
8 3212 Arctic Fancy [Daniel] Saran S. 53.5 8
9 0000 Addab [Mujeeb] Sher S. 53.0 12
10 0141 Sadaf [Daniel] A. Imran K. 53.0 4
11 4011 Splendid Star [Daniel] S. Tamang 53.0 1
12 1244 Added Asset [Daniel] Som S. 51.0 3
13 0112 Soviet Port [Bharath] C. Ruzaan 51.0 7
1. Mameena (5) 2. Auctioneer (6) 3. Quickdraw McGraw (2)

4th Race 3.30 pm.

Governor’s Cup 1,600m (Cl I; Cl II eligible — Rt. 66-94)
1 4020 Freedom Dancer [Vijay] Surender S. 62.5 5
2 2013 Stately Don [Daniel] A. Imran K. 61.0 3
3 1000 Arendal [Vijay] C. Alford 58.0 6
4 3040 Illustrious Reign [Daniel] Manohar S. 58.0 7
5 0343 Alyssum [Vijay] A. Kader 56.0 1
6 0000 Prince Obolensky [Stephens] K. P. Appu 47.0 4
7 - 400 Giorgio [Asfand] Khalanader 47.0 2
1. Alyssum (5) 2. Arendal (3) 3. Statelty Don (2)

5th Race 4.00 pm.

Calcutta St. Leger 2,800m (Terms, 4-y-o only)
1 0024 Andestine [Bharath] Md Amil 56.0 4
2 0442 Andreyev [Padmanabhan] A. Kader 56.0 1
3 1202 Harry The Horse [Stephens] K. P. Appu 56.0 5
4 1214 Alvarada [Vijay] C. Alford 54.5 2
5 1223 Surfside [D. Byramji] C. Ruzaan 54.5 3
1. Andreyev (2) 2. Alvarada (4) 3. Surfside (5)

6th Race 4.35 pm.

Lumination Handicap 1,100m (Cl III — Rt. 44-72) — Indian jockeys only
1 3212 Ispahan [Stephens] Rutherford A. 60.5 5
2 2123 Winning Hand [Javed] R. Gowli 59.5 10
3 3000 Kansai [Bharath] S. Rabani 58.5 6
W ---- Crimson King [Daniel] (Withdrawn) 57.5 --
5 1311 Master Bold [Vijay] C. Alford 57.5 7
6 1300 Santillana [Daniel] B. Gurang 57.0 1
7 0000 Peace Envoy [Daniel] Som S. 52.5 3
8 - 000 Smokey Bear [Daniel] Brij S. 52.5 2
9 0020 Cavala [Asfand] Md Islam 52.0 8
10 0004 Raaz [Javed] M. Reuben 52.0 13
11 4002 Sovereign Bullet [Daniel] A. Imran K. 52.0 4
12 1210 Bird’s Empire [Daniel] Saran S. 51.5 12
13 1204 Kargil Soldier [Stephens] P. Kumar 50.5 11
14 4000 Ardon [Daniel] S. Tamang 48.5 9
1. Ispahan (1) 2. Raaz (10) 3. Bird’s Empire (12)
Day’s Best: Tsaynen Blue
Double: Alyssum & Andreyev

Calcutta, March 13: 
Accr-ete, Crucible, and Classic Pursuit were impressive when the following horses seen exercising today morning:

Outer sand track

1,400m: Accrete (C. Alford) and Albright (A. P. Singh) in 1-38s; (800m) 56s; (400m) 29s. Former was a distance better and moved very well..
1,200m: Crucible (C. Alford) 1-26s; (800m) 55s; (400m) 28s. Moved well. Remember Me (Gowli) in 1-32s; (800m) 1-3s; (400m) 33s.Chivalrous (Brij) in 1-35s; (800m) 1-4s; (400m) 33s.
1,000m: Classic Pursuit (Islam) and Charlene (Rabani) in 1-18 s; (400m) 29s. Former was a length better and moved well. Falconaire (Rb) in 1-20s; (400m) 33s.

Sand track

1,200m: Winning Hand (M. Reuben) in 1-33s; (800m) 1-1 4/5s; (600m) 46s; (400m) 31s.
800m: Bold Apparel (A. Imran) and Alborada (Brij) in 56s; (400m) 28s. They were level. Both were easy.

On Monday, outer sand track

Andreyev, Supreme Desire and American worked well on Monday.

800m: Andreyev (Rabani) in 52s; (600m) 39s; (400m) 25s. Very fit. Supreme Desire (Upahdya) and Bhuthnath (P. Kumar) in 53s; (600m) 39s; (400m) 26s. They were level and moved well. The latter joined at 600m.American (E. Smith) in 54s; (600m) 40s; (400m) 27s. Moved well. Heaven’s Blessing (G. Singh) in 59s; (600m) 44s; (400m) 30s.

Sand track

800m: Crest Star (Amjad) in 54s; (600m) 40s; (400m) 26s. Very easy. Illustrious Reign (Manohar) in 58s; (600m) 40s; (400m) 25s. Fit. Sadaf (A. Imran) in 1-2s; (400m) 30s. Unextended.
600m: Arctic Fancy ( Manohar) in 41s; (400m) 27s. Easy. Ghunghat (Nasruddin) in 41s; (400m) 27s. Coming up now.

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