Depleted Bengal allow Bihar a wide berth
Shukla waits fingers crossed
Injury to keep Devang out
I’m not too old for the game: Pioline
Wildcard duo ousts Paes-Bhupathi
Indians can stop Aussies: Pataudi
Vandana best
Calcutta Races/ Altimara looks best
Bangalore Races/ Fantastic Belle springs a surpris

Calcutta, Jan. 6: 
Bengal 608/5 Decl.
Bihar 323 & 302/3

If Bihar were spoiling for a fight in the Ranji tie at the Eden Gardens, they didn’t get one today. Bengal, hit by the exit of three frontline bowlers, simply stepped aside and allowed their opponents the right of way.

If the hosts’ hopes of a win were dented yesterday after medium-pacer Laxmi Ratan Shukla ruled himself out with some boorish behavior, they suffered a body blow today when Utpal Chatterjee and Shib Shankar Pal too had to leave stage.

Utpal, who picked up five wickets in the Bihar first innings, had taken the field this morning with fever but was forced to call it quits before lunch. Pal followed, showing similar symptoms.

Bihar, 16 for one overnight in nine overs, lost just two wickets on the final day as they reached 302 by stumps, drawn five overs too early to lessen the frustration of watching a meaningless joust.

The visitors had followed on after being all out for 323 yesterday in reply to Bengal’s imposing 608 for five declared.

While the missing men did ‘contribute’ to the end result, Bihar’s overnight batsmen can take a great deal of the credit for seeing off the most crucial period of the day with the right mix of caution and aggression.

Nikhilesh Ranjan and skipper Rajiv Kumar were together for a total of 216 minutes as they added 159 for the second wicket. One hundred and forty four of them came today.

A respectable draw was all but sealed.

Bengal picked up five points by virtue of their first innings lead, and they will now defintely finish third on the East Zone table. They will meet Baroda away from home in a pre-quarter final clash beginning March 8.

Rajiv Kumar, looking very good today, fell on 82 while trying to turn one to the on-side, the ball catching the back of the bat before ballooning to widish mid-on. Ranjan went on to remain unbeaten on 126 for his second century of the season and his third in Ranji ties.

The opener spent 371 minutes in the middle to help carry his team to safety. He had 19 fours and a six in his innings.

Sunil Kumar remained unbeaten on 56 after Tariqur Rehman fell for 32 while trying to go for a big one.

Off-spinner Sourashish Lahiri picked up both wickets but failed to show the polish that he and the other Bengal bowlers presented yesterday.

And when Utpal and then Pal had to leave the field, the hosts provided a pathetic picture.

If their bowlers went down a notch or two, the fielding showed the all too familiar signs of disintegration and dismay.

The ticket to the knockout stage has been aquired, but Bengal will have to buck up from here if they hope to make a mark where it matters. It is easy to look positive when the going is good, but they have to learn to keep the body language right when the chips are down.


Calcutta, Jan. 6: 
A day after Laxmi Ratan Shukla invited severe sanctions with some boorish behavior on the field, there is a softening of the stance in the Bengal dressing room. He will be hoping this wind blows into the boardrooms of the CAB where his fate will be decided soon..

“Yes, he’s said ‘sorry’ today and I’m willing to put the episode behind me,” said Srikant Kalyani, with whom Shukla had a confrontation while the latter was standing in for injured skipper Devang Gandhi. “I think he should be given another chance,” he said, summing the mood in the Bengal camp.

“He has been asked to give the team management a letter (of apology), and our report to the CAB officials will be submitted after that,” coach Palash Nandy said today.

Minimum ban on cards

The report is expected to be first taken up by the cricket committee of the association, before it moves to the working committee for ratification or change. The mood in the CAB suggests, a minimum ban for the rest of the season is on the cards.

“What he told an opponent (Dhoni) doesn’t matter that much, because these things do happen in cricket and are not always one-sided either, but refusing to obey the skipper is like mutiny,” chief selector Ahok Malhotra said today.

Even as the players, team management and many other were ready to offer another repreive, there was also this belief that “this boy will never change”. Shukla has certainly built a ‘reputation’ for himself.

CAB president Jagmohan Dalmiya was among those that shared this frustration.

“I have spoken to him and Nikhil Haldipur in the past, telling them to do mend their ways and do justice to their talent but it seems this boy won’t change,” he said this evening.

The decision will depend on the members, but Shukla will have to realise that the change remains his prerogative.


Calcutta, Jan. 6: 
Devang Gandhi’s hopes of making an impression before the Aussies arrive for a tour of India suffered a huge blow today. Forced to sit out the last two days of the Ranji tie against Bihar with a knee problem, the Bengal skipper learnt today that he now needs an athroscopic surgery.

“I’ll get it done as early as possible, within the next few days, and get back quickly,” he said today. He will, however, need at least three weeks’ rest after that and will almost certainly miss the Duleep Trophy, the squad for which will be selected tomorrow.

While circumstances will keep out Devang, Ashok Malhotra will find it very difficult to press for a big representation from Bengal after their slip from the East Zone Ranji pedestal. “We must now realise that we are not the same force anymore,” he said today. “Teams that have done better than us will want their players in the squad.”

Indications are that Rohan Gavaskar and Utpal are the only ‘certainties’ from the state at the moment and even Nikhil Haldipur’s selection cannot be taken for granted.

The wicketkeeper’s berth is likely to be a fight between Deep Dasgupta and Bihar’s Mahinder Singh Dhoni.

Sourav Ganguly has informed that he will play only the tie against West Zone, beginning in Rajkot on February 1. Shiv Sundar Das is, thus, tipped for the choice of the skipper. Debashish Mohanty, Ajay Barik, Rashmi Ranjan Parida and Sanjay Raul are the other Orissa players expected to make the squad.


Chennai, Jan. 6: 
At a time when the ATP is actively backing GenerationNext’s bid to overthrow the old guard, Cedric Pioline is a law unto himself. Five months shy of 32, the French star is getting more consistent with every passing year and standing like a rock in the face of relentless pressure from the likes of Gustavo Kuerten, Marat Safin, Lleyton Hewitt and Magnus Norman.

The oldest player in the top-50 of Champions Race, the world No. 16 bagged a career-high two titles in 2000 to post a top-20 finish for the fourth consecutive year. And this, despite being out of action for over a month after breaking three bones on the left hand playing volleyball and needing surgery.

Son of distinguished volleyball-playing parents, Pioline may never have been in tennis had he obeyed his Romanian mother’s wish. A member of the national volleyball team, she wanted his son to pursue studies rather than make a career out of sport. But 17-year-old Cedric was a stubborn young man and stuck to his favourite sport.

The Formula One racing fan turned pro in 1989 and took three seasons to crack the top-50. He stayed in that zone for five years before moving into the top-20 bracket. Winner of five career titles, Pioline has lost in the final 12 times including twice in Grand Slam events. Both those defeats — ’93 US Open and ’97 Wimbledon — were at the hands of the one and only Pete Sampras.

The stormy petrel of French tennis in his younger days, Pioline is not as fluent while talking as he is on court. Despite being a man in heavy demand — he did TV shoots, posed for fashion magazines and attended fashion shows — during his weeklong stay here, the Frenchman agreed to speak to The Telegraph after his post-quarter final press conference last evening.

Following are excerpts

Q How do you manage to defy the age factor?

A (Murmuring) How many times do I have to answer that question! I know there are many people who feel I am too old. But I’m only 31 and don’t think that way at all. I’m not too old for the game.

Q The ATP is promoting the new generation of players. Don’t you feel insecure or envious?

A There are some fine young players now and it’s very good that ATP is promoting them. New faces, new champions are good for tennis. Why should I be bothered by what ATP is doing? But yes, I wish they did something like this when players like me were coming up. We may have benefited.

Q Do you believe the young brigade will take over from guys like you, Sampras and Agassi in the next couple of years?

A Some talented youngsters have had some great results recently. I don’t think all of them will come into the top-10, but guys like Safin, Kuerten, Norman and Philippoussis have a very good chance of going to the top.

Q After being on the circuit for 13-14 years, what keeps you going?

A I want to improve my ranking and get back to the top-10. I want to win more matches, more titles.

Q You have been on the losing side of two Grand Slam finals. Do you honestly think you still have a chance of winning a major?

A Why not? I’m always working hard to improve my game, I’m healthy and playing some good tennis. So who knows. I just hope that I don’t meet Sampras in another Slam final.

Q You had some problems with the French federation in the early 90s and refused to play Davis Cup. One of the ties you skipped was against India in Frejus and France were shocked. Do you rue that decision?

A Yeah, they won’t let me bring my personal coach for Davis Cup ties. But that was sorted out and I’ve played many times for France. No regrets for skipping those ties.

Q A lot of top men often stay out of Davis Cup. Do you enjoy playing the team competition?

A Of course I enjoy Davis Cup. It’s a nice feeling to be playing for your country and doing well. It’s so different than playing on the Tour where you are on your own. Some of my best moments came in Davis Cup like when we beat Sweden to win the title in ’96.

Q France has several talented players but none of them have been really successful. You continue to be the No. 1 player from your country. Isn’t it a worry for French tennis?

A It’s true that our young players have not made a big impression. They have the potential for sure, but maybe they are not working as hard as they ought to be.

Q Is French tennis suffering because of a surge in soccer popularity after the ’98 World Cup and Euro 2000 triumphs?

A I don’t think so. Soccer is the No. 1 game but tennis is in quite a healthy state too. We have several important tournaments, the federation has a good development programme and there are lots of good players coming up. Six Frenchmen finished in the top-50 of the Champions Race. That’s not bad.

Q How many more years would you like to play?

A I don’t know. It could be two years, three years, anything. It all depends on how healthy I am and how I feel. I won’t be in the game if I’m not enjoying it. I don’t know when that day will come.

Q Finally, what about life after tennis?

A I haven’t thought about it yet, but I’d definitely like to be involved with the game I’ve played so long.


Chennai, Jan. 6: 
Two unheralded left-handers dropped the biggest bombshell at the fifth Gold Flake Open.

Mose Navarra, a stocky Italian with flowing blond hair, and Barry Cowan, a Briton with no claim to fame, fought off two match-points to dethrone the sultans of Nungambakkam Stadium tonight to leave the $ 400,000 ATP meet staring at a totally deglamourised final day.

Up against three-time champions Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi, wildcard entrants Navarra and Cowan pulled themselves out of a deep hole to stun the second seeds 2-6, 7-6 (8-6), 6-4 in a little over two hours. Not only did that huge upset rob the tournament of its last stars, it also terminated an unbeaten 14-match streak for the Indian Express at this venue.

The unseeded Italian-British duo, teaming up only for the second time, will come up against top seeds Byron and Wayne Black in the final. The Zimbabweans made short work of Czechs Frantisek Cermak and Ota Fukarek to reach their maiden final as a team.

The singles final will bring together Michal Tabara and Andrei Stoliarov, the Czech and Russian making the cut in starkly contrasting fashion. While Tabara had to be on court for 15 minutes, the Russian was really made to sweat it out in a two-hour, 10-minute marathon.

Tabara was caught by surprise to see his opponent Kristian Pless call it quits in the fifth game of the match. Tendinitis on the right shoulder forced 19-year-old Pless, the 1999 world No. 1 junior, to concede the first semi-final before it had warmed up. The Danish teenager — trailing 0-4, 30-0 at that stage — had looked a strong bet for the title in this topsy-turvy field.

Stoliarov and Tommy Robredo, called on to court much earlier than they normally would have been, engaged themselves in a long drawn-out battle which produced more errors than winners. After the last point was played in a scratchy match, Stoliarov was a 4-6, 6-3, 6-4 victor.

The Indians have none but themselves to blame for not closing out their match in two sets. Having cruised through the first set, breaking the off-form Cowan twice, the world championship runners-up had the whip firmly in their hands when they captured the Briton’s serve again in the second set — in game 7.

Serving to open up a 5-3 lead, Bhupathi played a nightmarish game. A brace of double-faults, the second one at 0-40, kept Navarra and Cowan alive. It was a grim battle thereafter, the Indians surviving a set-point on Paes’ serve in game ten.

In the tie-break, the two-time Grand Slam champions squandered a 6-4 lead and lost four points on the trot to force a third set on themselves. Cowan, who had been a sleeping partner to the highly charged-up Navarra till then, brought off a sleek crosscourt service return winner on set-point.

With Navarra maintaining his high level of play and Cowan raising his, Paes and Bhupathi looked increasingly clueless. Bhupathi’s returning left much to be desired while Paes missed volleys he would normally execute left-handed.

Bhupathi fought off the first break-point of the final set in game 3, but Paes dropped serve in game 9 as Cowan caressed a forehand service return effortlessly past the rushing Indian. That break was all their rivals needed to bag the semi-final, Navarra serving it out on first match-point.

“The country doesn’t have too many heroes, we don’t have the luxury of playing without pressure at home,” said Paes who admitted he was terribly disappointed.

Robredo, the 18-year-old, started on a very promising note against Stoliarov.

A backhand down the line pass on the third break-point helped the Spaniard capture Stoliarov’s serve in game 3. Serving for a 4-2 lead, Robredo hit four poor forehand shots to surrender the initiative. Robredo held serve to pocket the first set. Robredo’s form dipped in the second set and Stoliarov was smart enough to take full toll.

Stoliarov, who has a soft second serve, controlled the baseline well. He made Robredo run from corner to corner. Getting error-prone and panicky, Robredo dropped serve twice and lost the second set.

With both tiring, the decider became a battle of attrition. The first three games went against serve. Robredo took a three-minute medical time-out to recover from cramps and battled on gamely but failed to take the plethora of breakback chances that Stoliarov presented.

The thrills and misses kept the three-fourths full Nungambakkam Stadium crowd in good spirits, but the quality of tennis on display was worthy more of a Challenger first round than an ATP semi-final. A total of 27 break-points in the three-set match told its own tale.


SINGLES, semi-finals: Michal Tabara (Cze) bt Kristian Pless (Den) 4-0 conceded; Andrei Stoliarov (Rus) bt Tommy Robredo (Spa) 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.

DOUBLES, semi-finals: Byron & Wayne Black (1, Zim) bt Frantisek Cermak & Ota Fukarek (Cze) 6-3, 6-4; Mose Navarra (Ita) & Barry Cowan (Bri) bt Leander Paes & Mahesh Bhupathi (1, Ind) 2-6, 7-6 (8-6), 6-4.


Calcutta, Jan. 6: 
Top priority for Steve Waugh’s Australians, who arrive in the first-half of February, will be to extend their already intimidating (and record- smashing) run of 15 Test victories.

Such has been their ruthlessness that Jimmy Adams, the West Indies captain, was today reduced to pleading his team “be given credit” for taking the Sydney Test into the fifth-day.

On the one hand, it’s a pathetic comment; on the other, speaks volumes for Team Australia. And, of course, the system which has nurtured Waugh and Glenn McGrath; Michael Slater and Jason Gillespie.

Champions all.

The Australians do appear unstoppable, but former India captain Mansur Ali Khan ‘Tiger’ Pataudi believes that potentially, India is the team (driven largely by batting) to mount the strongest challenge.

Pataudi captained India in three series against Australia — at home in 1964-65 and 1969-70 and once in Australia (1967-68). His innings of 75 and 85 at the MCG, when a hamstring injury hampered mobility, are still saluted as among the most courageous ever.

“If India can get the act right, at home, Australia will be pushed to the limit... I’m very impressed with our batting, and though the bowling isn’t in the same league, Anil Kumble’s return would improve things. It will be different, yes, if he continues to remain unavailable, but...” Pataudi told The Telegraph this afternoon.

[Australia’s last trip to India, nearly three years ago, saw them lose the Test series 1-2.]

Pataudi, who turned 60 yesterday, added from his New Delhi residence: “Potentially, therefore, it’s India which is best placed to halt what has been a fantastic run.”

According to Pataudi, more than skill and overall depth, it’s the Australian attitude which makes a telling difference.

“The Australians are brought up to win and, so, they mind losing. That hurts. (Adds laughing) This team, in any case, would find it hard to lose... We, on the other hand, don’t mind losing because we aren’t used to winning. We’ll be a far better unit once this attitude changes.”

Pataudi agreed coach John Wright would have to take the lead in re-casting attitude, though he acknowledged the change wouldn’t come “overnight.”

“Wright comes from a nation where the talent may not be exceptional, but the attitude is right... It’s not without reason that the Board has appointed a general consultant (Geoff Marsh) from Australia and gone for a New Zealander as coach,” Pataudi pointed out.

Statistics apart, though, would Waugh’s team be remembered as the greatest-ever?

“Difficult to judge... For instance, it appears Australia’s opponents haven’t been quite as formidable as the challenge faced by some top-bracket teams of the past... What stands out, however, is that everybody in this team has the capacity to play positively. It’s not just a paper-strength.”

Pataudi, cricket’s youngest Test captain, remarked he would give Waugh “very high marks” and was especially impressed by the commitment-aspect of his leadership. “It’s an even bigger plus, for Australia, that he is so highly respected — both as a cricketer and human being...”

Waugh led Australia in 14 of the 15 Tests — injury kept him out of the Adelaide game, against the West Indies, when the captain’s cap was worn by Adam Gilchrist. Significantly, 11 of the Australian wins have been at home.

‘Sourav is doing fine’

Talking about Sourav Ganguly’s captaincy, Pataudi said: “These are still early days, but he’s doing fine. On the field, the team is certainly more eager... Today, at least, there isn’t a specific tip I would like to offer Sourav.”

While welcoming the Board move to appoint Marsh (who, by the way, was a contender for the coach’s job), Pataudi emphasised that steps to restructure domestivc cricket “ought to have been undertaken 25 years ago.”

As he put it: “Actually, we’ve got to make good this delay of two decades-plus... In any case, whatever Marsh has to offer (as general consultant) will come to nought unless the Board’s approach is altered. We need professionalism, not politics. Off the field, too, our attitude must change.”

Specifically, Pataudi observed the Board must pay “immediate attention” to the quality of wickets.

“If we are to be competitive, across the world, hard and true wickets will have to be prepared. After all, we have to face the rest of the world on its terms... Remember, nobody will offer spinning tracks.”

That apart, the Board must address issues such as the (regular) fielding of over-aged players. “I was shocked to read six of our U-19 boys are over-aged... For me, that’s an unacceptable situation.”

Pataudi could have highlighted other shortcomings, too, but chose not to. Not this Nawab’s style, after all. He may be more forthcoming, though, should the Board initiate a one-to-one.

In fact, the Board would do well to involve Pataudi, among others, when the Marsh blueprint is debated.


Calcutta, Jan. 6: 
Vandana Agarwal emerged winner in the Gold Division of the Bengal ladies amateur golf championship at the Royal today. She finished at 299 and was followed by Parnita Agarwal on 302 and Irina Brar 312.


Gold division — 1. Vandana Agarwal (299), 2. Parnita Agarwal (302), 3. Irina Brar (312).

Kanungoe Trophy (Gross)/Silver div. — 1. M. Halwasiya (350), 2. S. Ray (371).

Bengal Challenge Cup (Nett) — 1. I. Chaudhri (307), 2. L. Posch (310).

Burdwan Cup (Gross) — 1. T. Tsuruya (382), 2. K. Soft (406). Nett — 1. S.C. Mahtab (302), 2. S.N. Jaidka (303).

Medal — Gold division: Best gross: A. Chopra (72), 1. P. Misra (73), 2. V. Agarwal (73).

Best 30-36 handicap: K.K. Chatterjee.

Bogey — Gold division: 1. P. Misra (+4), 2. G. Raikhy (all square).

Silver division: 1. S. Rawla (all square), 2. I. Srivastava (1 down).

Stableford — Gold division: 1. P. Grewal (35 points), 2. I. Brar (34).

Seniors — Gross I. Chaudhri (198), Nett K. Soft (145).

Juniors — 1. I.Brar (312), 2. G. Raikhy (318).

Best gross — Gold division: I. Brar, V. Agarwal, P. Grewal (74); Silver division: M. Halwasiya (84); Bronze division: T. Tsuruya (95).


Calcutta, Jan. 6: 
It is Derby Day tomorrow. The fare at the Royal Calcutta Turf Club (RCTC) grounds is going to start from where it had finished off on New Year’s Day. Stands are, once again, going to be packed — not necessarily by those who made it to the course on January 1 — the cash register will continue to remain busy, and one also expect favourites to perform the way they did last Monday.

At least three favourites, in a card of seven events, have fairly good credentials to keep the Sunday crowd in cheering mood. They are Soviet Port, Endless Surprise and of course, Altimara in the all-important 3.30 pm event — the Kingfisher Calcutta Derby Stakes, sponsored by United Breweries.

The 2,400m classic is a tailor-made race for the Razeen-Treasure’s Nest daughter. The maestro Rashid Byramji-trainee already has the fillies’ Guineas to her credit and had lost the 2,000 Guineas narrowly to her owner-mate, Aloritz. But what may interest most is her up-country classic record.

In the summer variety of the 2,000m Kingfisher Derby (Bangalore), the Deepak Khaitan-owned filly had placed a close fourth to the likes of Allaires and Hello Brothers — all champions in their own right. The fact that she was outclassed by Six Speed earlier in the 1,600m fillies’ classic but tightened the verdict alarmingly in the Derby, it only goes on to suggest that longer the trip, the better Altimara goes. The fight may turn out be for the second place between Daggers Drawn and Alvarada.

Read as: Horse number, last four runs, horse name, trainer, jockey, weight & draw:

1st Race at 12.30 pm.

Wiseman Cup 1,200m (Cl I —Rated 88 & over)
1 3044 Mystic Hill [Goenka] Md Yasin 60.0 3
2 - - 20 Tsavo [Asfand] Khalander 58.5 1
3 - 111 Anolini [Vijay] C. Alford 57.5 4
4 1123 Highland Flame [Daniel] A. Kader 55.0 2
1. Highland Flame (4) 2. Anolini (3) 3. Mystic Hills (1)
Highland Flame: Went easy in his last run. Has potential to do better even over the slated trip. Anolini: Unbeaten in last three starts. Myastic Hill: May place.

2nd Race at 1.00 pm.

Alokananda Stakes 1,200m (Terms, Fillies 3-y-o only)
1 - - - 1 Calorescence [Vijay] C. Alford 54.0 3
2 - - - 2 Albright [Vijay] A. Kader 50.0 2
3 - - 20 Andrada [Vijay] S. Rajesh 50.0 1
4 ---- Lamborghini [P. Locke] Md Yasin 50.0 5
5 - - - 4 Maid To Measure [Daniel] A. Imran K. 50.0 4
1. Calorescence (1) 2. Albright (2) 3. Andrada (3)
Calorescence: A facile winner on debut. Looks good to score an encore. Albright: Was outclassed by Astride. Looks improved now. Andrada: May place.

3rd Race at 1.40 pm.

Golden Can Handicap 1,600m (Cl V, Rt. 00-28) — Indian jockeys only
1 0040 Blessed Spirit[Daniel] A. Imran K. 60.5 5
2 3010 Soviet Port [Bath] P. Shroff 60.5 1
3 0122 Eau Savage [Bath] S. Shanker 60.0 6
4 0034 American [Karki] P. Kujur 60.0 3
5 4444 Crest Star [Goenka] Md Yasin 54.0 2
6 4303 Adeline [Daniel] C. Alford 50.0 4
1. Soviet Port (2) 2. Eau Savage (3) 3. Blessed Spirit (1)
Soviet Port: Ran a poor race in last start 2,000m after 1,400m victory over Alborada who is now in Class III. May make amends over the slated trip. Eau Savage: Well-prepared for the race. Blessed Spirit: May place.

4th Race at 2.15 pm.

Rising Bell Handicap 1,400m (Cl III —Rt. 44-72)
1 - 010 Santa Monica [Daniel] N. Connorton 60.0 7
2 - 422 Lovely Prospect [Daniel] A. Imran K. 56.0 6
3 1101 Lockers Park [Bath] S. Rabani 56.0 8
4 4000 Aragrove [Daniel] G. Upadhya 55.0 9
5 0300 Sky Command [Mujeeb] K. P. Appu 54.5 2
6 - 440 Gambino [Daniel] B. Gurang 53.5 3
7 4004 High Life [Bath] S. Rajesh 53.0 11
8 0000 Gentle Priest [Bath] M. Reuben 52.0 5
9 1310 No Regrets [Javed] R. Gowli 51.5 12
10 - - 00 Just Kidding [R. Alford] Salim K. 51.0 10
11 0232 Black Mane [Karki] P. Kujur 51.0 1
12 1210 Crucible [Vijay] C. Alford 50.0 4
1. No Regrets (9) 2. High Life (7) 3. Lovely Prospect (2)
No Regrets: Capable of carrying her topweight to victory again, though well penalised. High Life: Not a very reliable customer. Lovely Prospect: May place.

5th Race at 2.50 pm.

Aphroze Handicap 1,100m (Cl III —Rt. 44-72) — Indian jockeys only
1 2211 Santillana [Daniel] A. Imran K. 60.0 4
2 3021 Winning Hand [Javed] R. Gowli 60.0 1
3 1321 Endless Surprise [Daniel] A. Kader 57.0 5
4 0300 Abstract [Daniel] Surender S. 55.0 3
5 0110 Scarlet Raider [Daniel] Som Singh 53.5 2
W ---- Andestine [D. Byramji] (Not declared to start) 53.0 --
1. Endless Surprise (3) 2. Santillana (1) 3. Winning Hand (2)
Endless Surprise: Improving with each run. May cash in on her current form. Santillana: Carried her heavy-impost to a facile victory. May try to make difficult for Endless Surprise. Winning Hand: May hope for place money.

6th Race at 3.30 pm

Kingfisher Calcutta Derby Stakes 2,400m (Terms, 4-y-o only)
1 - - 04 Andreyev [Padmanabhan] S. Rajesh 56.0 9
2 - - 03 Daggers Drawn [Padmanabhan] F. Lynch 56.0 1
3 0110 Earl Grey [Darashah] K. P. Appu 56.0 7
4 - 314 Soviet Ace [Dhariwal] P. Shroff 56.0 8
5 - 443 Wandering Warrior [D. Byramji] Md Amil 56.0 2
6 - - 12 Altimara [R. Byramji] A. Kader 54.5 5
7 3121 Alvarada [Vijay] C. Alford 54.5 3
8 2204 Silver Toy [D. Byramji] C. Ruzaan 54.5 4
9 - 234 Tsaynen Blue [Rodrigues] R. Gowli 54.5 6
1. Altimara (6) 2. Daggers Drawn (2) 3. Alvarada (7)
Altimara: Lost the 2,000 Guineas narrowly to her ownermate after winning the fillies’ classic comfortably. Longer the trip, the better she goes. Daggers Drawn: May fins the favourite, Altimara, a hard nut to crack. Alvarada: Out and out a stayer but a poor match for ownermate. Andreyev: Place for him, at the most.

7th Race at 4.10 pm.

Glasgow Courser Handicap 1,400m (Cl I V —Rt. 22-50) — Indian jockeys only
1 - 000 Spanish Drum’s [Daniel] S. Tamang 61.0 9
2 0400 Remember The Day [R. Alford] K. Gurang 58.0 11
W ---- Cool Quest [D. Byramji] (Not declared to start) 58.0 --
4 0203 Red Trident [R. Alford] Rutherford A. 56.0 5
5 - - 00 Stella Blue [Mujeeb] Md Yacoob 54.5 7
6 0000 Falconaire [R. Alford] G. Upadhya 53.5 2
7 ---- Abashed [Vijay] A. P. Singh 53.5 1
8 2300 Russian Czar [R. Alford] Salim K. 53.0 12
9 2033 Supreme Desire [Daniel] Md Amil 52.0 6
10 ---- Alembic [Vijay] C. Alford 52.0 3
11 -212 The Stud [Rodrigues] R. Gowli 51.5 8
12 0324 Calculus [Asfand] C. Razaan 51.0 4
13 0000 Ghunghat [Goenka] S. Nadruddin 49.5 10
1. Alembic (10) 2. Red Trident (4) 3. The Stud (11)
Alembic: Good in his morning tirlas but running after over five month’s of lay off. May win. Red Trident: Has had a dress-rehersal in last start. May upset. The Stud: Failed favourite in his last start. Working well, however. Calculus: May place.

Day’s Best: Altimara

Double: Soviet Port & Endless Surprise


Bangalore, Jan. 6: 
The Ganapathy-trained unfancied filly Fantastic Belle scored a comfortable victory over Adamile in the 2,400m The Hindu Oaks, the main event at the Bangalore races held on Saturday. B. Prakash partnered the Efisio-Bolshoi Belle daughter to victory.


(With inter-state dividends)
1. January Plate 1,200m: (4-7-8) Great Occasion (Hughes) 1; Pettalumma 2; Amazon Gold 3. Not run: Paksha Netram (9) & Black Ocean (12). Won by: 2-1/2; 2-1/2; (1-17.1). Tote: Win Rs 24; Place: 13; 17; 16; Quinella: 42; Tanala: 144. Fav: Great Occasion (4).
2. Gokarna Plate 1,200m: (6-5-10) Diamond Harbour (Warren) 1; Gordon’s Pet 2; Roman Flame 3. Won by: 1-3/4; 1/2; (1-17.8). Tote: Win Rs 167; Place: 29; 20; 16; Quinella: 398; Tanala: 3,358. Fav: Roman Flame (10).
3. Kitty Bank Plate, Div-II 1,200m: (1/12-5-7) Good Win (I. Chisty) & Contour (Harish) 1; Scandal Sheet 2; Ardent Blue 3. Not run: Beauty Castle (10). Won by: D-H; 5; 3-3/4; (1-17.3). Tote: Win Rs 15 (on 1); 94 (on 12); Place: 16 (on 1); 37 (on 12); 20; Quinella: 322; Tanala: 1,610. Fav: Recapitulation (2).
4. Yadavagiri Cup 1,400m: (8-9-5) Desert Gold (Prithviraj) 1; Celestial Gold 2; Avocation 3. Won by: 2-1/4; 3-1/4; (1-28.5). Tote: Win Rs 46; Place: 17; 21; 15; Quinella: 214; Tanala: 952. Fav: Avocation (5).
5. The Hindu Bangalore Oaks 2,400m: (4-2-1-8) Fantastic Belle (Prakash) 1; Adamile (Marshall) 2; Sans Egale (Shroff) 3; Mosaic (Rajendra) 4. Won by: 1-1/4; SH; 1-1/4; (2-37). Tote: Win Rs 214; Place: 46; 20; 14; Quinella: 531; Tanala: 5,646. Fav: Access All Areas (9).
6. New Millennium Cup 1,400m: (1-2-3) Averoff (Shroff) 1; Tempt Me Not 2; Symphony Of Fire 3. Won by: 1; 1-1/4; (1-27.4). Tote: Win Rs 64; Place: 17; 28; 38; Quinella: 228; Tanala: 2,930. Fav: The Music Man (4).
7. Kitty Bank Plate, Div-I 1,200m; (7-12-9) Spectacular Style (Shakti) 1; Plain Truth 2; Winning Charm 3. Won by: 5-1/4; 2-3/4; (1-17.3). Tote: Win Rs 46; Place: 17; 83; 36; Quinella: 1,101; Tanala: 9,660. Fav: Super Premium (11).
8. R. H. Charles Memorial Plate 1,400m: (1-5-8) Musky Bird (Sharp) 1; Ronson 2; Facsimile 3. Won by: Nk; 1-1/4; (1-29.4). Tote: Win Rs 92; Place: 23; 21; 15; Quinella: 318; Tanala: 2,221. Fav: Facsimile (8).
Jackpot: Rs 4,16,790 (Carried over).
Treble: (i) Rs 3,424; (ii) Rs 2,430.    

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